The Expansion of England: Two Courses of Lectures

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Macmillan, 1883 - 309 Seiten
 

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Seite 21 - Prussia was unknown ; and, in order that he might rob a neighbour whom he had promised to defend, black men fought on the coast of Coromandel, and red men scalped each other by the Great Lakes of North America...
Seite 181 - We hold ourselves bound to the natives of our Indian territories by the same obligations of duty which bind us to all our other subjects ; and those obligations, by the blessing of Almighty God, we shall faithfully and conscientiously fulfil.
Seite 293 - ... a power, to which, for purposes of foreign conquest and subjugation, Rome, in the height of her glory, is not to be compared ; a power which has dotted over the surface of the whole globe with her possessions and military posts, whose morning drum-beat, following the sun, and keeping company with the hours, circles the earth with one continuous and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England.
Seite 46 - I expected to find a contest between a government and a people: I found two nations warring in the bosom of a single state: I found a struggle, not of principles, but of races...
Seite 164 - are vulgar when they are not liberalised by history, and history fades into mere literature when it loses sight of its relation to practical politics.
Seite 170 - Spectator," the past age returns, the England of our ancestors is revivified. The May-pole rises in the Strand again in London; the churches are thronged with daily worshippers; the beaux are gathering in the...
Seite 170 - I get the expression of the life of the time ; of the manners, of the movement, the dress, the pleasures, the laughter, the ridicules of society — the old times live again, and I travel in the old country of England. Can the heaviest historian do more for me...
Seite 14 - We ought by no means to take for granted that this is desirable. Bigness is not necessarily greatness; if by remaining in the second rank of magnitude we can hold the first rank morally and intellectually, let us sacrifice mere material magnitude.
Seite 156 - When we have accustomed ourselves to contemplate the whole Empire together and call it all England, we shall see that here too is a United States. Here too is a great homogeneous people, one in blood language religion and laws, but dispersed over a boundless space.

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