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C ο Ν Τ Ε Ν Τ S.

PA R T I.

LECT. I. THE INTRODUCTION, and the

DistrIBUTION of the Subjeet, Page 1 LECT. II. Of the Nature and Use of Topics, 8 LECT. III. Of UNIVERSAL Topics, 14 LECT. IV. Of particular Topics; and Objections to the Use of Topics cnswered,

23 LECT. V. Of AMPLIFICATION,

31

PART II.

LECT. VI. Of METHOD in Narrative Difcourses,

39 LECT. VII. Of Method in Argumentative

Discourses; of ANALYSIS and SYNTHESIS ; and

of GEOMETRICAL DEMONSTRATION, 49 LECT. VIII. Of the several Parts of a proper DEMONSTRATION,

57 LECT. IX. Of the ANALYTIC Method. Of

Locke's Eday on the Human Understanding, and
Hutcheson's Moral Philosophy,

66 LECT. X. Of the METHOD of Mr. Hume's In

quiry into the Principles of Morals, Hartley's Ob- Servations on Man, Harris's Hermes, that of Sermons, and of Miscellaneous Writings, 73

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PART

LECT. XIX. Of Novelty,

174 LECT. XX. Of the SUBLIME,

181 LECT. XXI. Of the Pleasure we receive from

Uniformity, and Variety; and first of Comparisons,

196 LECT. XXII. Of the Nature of METAPHORS,

216 LECT. XXIII. Rules for the Use of Meta, PHORS; and of ALLEGORIES,

224 LECT. XXIV. Of CONTRAST in general, and particularly of Wit, the risible, and the ridiculous,

23.5 LECT. XXV. Of BURLESQUE, PARODY, the

Mock-Heroic, HUMOUR, and Irony, 252 LECT. XXVI. OF RIDDLES, Puns, and the serious ANTITHESIS,

266 LECT. XXVII. Of MeTONYMY,

276 LECT. XXVIII. Of the Hyperbole and BomBAS'T,

288 LECT. XXIX. Of PERSONIFICATION, 295 LECT. XXX. Of IMITATION, and the Satisfaétion we receive from the Completeness of Things,

311 LECT. XXXI. Of CLIMAX, and the Order of Words in a Sentence,

329 LECT. XXXII. Of PERSPICUITY in Style,

336 LECT. XXXIII. Of the Resemblance between

Sound and Sense,
LECT. XXXIV. Of HARMONY in Verse, 356
LECT. XXXV. Of HARMONY in Prose, 369

A COURSE

346

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A

COURSE OF LECTURES

ON

ORATORY AND CRITICISM.

LECTURE I.

The INTRODUCTION and the DISTRIBUTION of

the Subječt.

The use of speech is common to all man

kind. For we find none of the human race but who are capable of expressing their ideas, sentiments, and intentions to others, in a more or less adequate manner, by words: and this capacity was necessary to that mutual intercourse, and free communication, without which beings of our social nature could not be happy.

It is the province of art to improve upon nature, by adding to her powers and advantages: and, for the exercise of our intellectual and active powers, all the gifts of nature are little more than the bare unwrought materials of those accomplishments, from which result the dignity and refined happiness of social life.

B

Thus

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