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ANNE BOLEYN

OR

THE SUPPRESSION OF THE RELIGIOUS

HOUSES

LONDON:

SAUNDERS AND OTLEY, CONDUIT STREET.

1854.

249. w. 382.

F. Shoberl, Printer to H.R.H. Prince Albert, 51, Rupert Street.

CONTENTS.

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1 5 12 22 28 32 40 44 47 53 60 65 72 77 84 97 104 117 122 125 130 139 144 148 153 162 165 167 171 180 183 191 193

CHAPTER I. How it began .
CHAPTER II. The First Institution of the Monks
CHAPTER III. The Abbey of St. Albyns
CHAPTER IV. Whitehall
CHAPTER V. The Holy City
CHAPTER VI. Plots
CHAPTER VII. The Visitation
CHAPTER VIII. The Suppression of the Abbey
CHAPTER IX. Martyrs and Mummeries
CHAPTER X. Greenwich
CHAPTER XI. A Story of the Floods in 1483.
CHAPTER XII. The Devil's Puzzle
CHAPTER XIII. Mimi
CHAPTER XIV. The Gospel Oak
CHAPTER XV. The Gentle Surrey
CHAPTER XVI. The Country Ride
CHAPTER XVII. The River
CHAPTER XVIII. The Pilgrimage of Grace
CHAPTER XIX. Progress and Pulling down
CHAPTER XX. The Terrace
CHAPTER XXI. One Tree Hill
CHAPTER XXII. Coming Events
CHAPTER XXIII. Love's Sacrifice
CHAPTER XXIV. The Monk and the Minstrel
CHAPTER XXV. Sports and Pastimes
CHAPTER XXVI. Death
CHAPTER XXVII. The Holy Maid of Kent
CHAPTER XXVIII. Conspiracies
CHAPTER XXIX. The Jousts at Greenwich
CHAPTER XXX. The walk to London
CHAPTER XXXI. Mark Smeaton
CHAPTER XXXII. Guilty? or not Guilty?
CHAPTER XXXIII. The Nightwatch
CHAPTER XXXIV. To the King—from the Ladye in the

Tower
CHAPTER XXXV. Last Scene of all

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ANNE BOLEYN;

OR,

THE SUPPRESSION OF THE RELIGIOUS HOUSES.

I.

HOW IT BEGAN.

May be I have written the heading of this, my first chapter, in haste. To tell how it began, would be to go back to no matter how far back. But, to fix a period, say, to the creation of the first pope: to the time when Religion was made a thing to strive and struggle, not suffer for. When, in place of the Martyr, the Persecutor arose; when there were rank and wealth, and power, and pride in the Church; when simplicity was superseded by ceremony, faith lost in fanaticism. But-how it began! Even in England, it were too much to say. From the time when the crafty Dunstan, through his savage myrmidons, did cruelty upon the gentle

, and loving Elgiva; from the time when the ungrateful Becket outraged his country; to the days of Wolsey, whose pride and pomp went the length and breadth of the land. But passing the faults, follies, and crimes, which led to Wickliffe, the Lollards, to William Sautre—the first martyr for the Reformation I would speak of the events more directly connected with the occasion that brought about the rupture of Rome and England: that freed the latter from the former, and-giving me the second title of this taledid away with the monasteries.

Pope Leo the Tenth, being in want to supply his extravagancies, and to support the luxury of his court, availed himself of an ancient custom, practised by the Catholic Church, of raising money by the sale of "Indulgencies.” These Indulgencies, which permitted to the purchaser the practice of several sins, and promised an exemption from the pains of purgatory hereafter, met with a brisk demand in the German and Italian States, and brought an enormous

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