Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the English Ecclesiastical Courts [1724-18]: With Tables of the Cases and Principal Matters ...

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Seite 438 - Hence it comes to pass that a man, who is very sober, and of a right understanding in all other things, may in one particular be as frantic as any in Bedlam ; if either by any sudden very strong impression, or long fixing his fancy upon one sort of thoughts, incoherent ideas have been cemented together so powerfully, as to remain united.
Seite 326 - Deceased, do make or cause to be made a true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the Goods Chattels and Credits...
Seite 113 - The king can do no wrong; which ancient and fundamental maxim is not to be understood, as if every thing transacted by the government was of course just and lawful, but means only two things. First, that whatever is exceptionable in the conduct of public affairs, is not to be imputed to the king, nor is he answerable for it...
Seite 438 - ... do not appear to me to have lost the faculty of reasoning; but having joined together some ideas very wrongly, they mistake them for truths, and they err as men do that argue right from wrong principles. For by the violence of their imaginations, having taken their fancies for realities, they make right deductions from them.
Seite 382 - School-master, who upon the first day of May, which shall be in the year of our Lord God...
Seite 436 - I left no means unemployed which long experience dictated ; but without the smallest effect. The day was wasted, and the Prosecutor, by the most affecting history of unmerited suffering, appeared to the Judge and Jury, and to a humane English audience, as the victim of the most wanton and barbarous oppression : at last Dr.
Seite 199 - Louis, by the grace of God King of France and Navarre, to our dear and well-beloved Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle, greeting.
Seite 439 - In short, herein seems to lie the difference between idiots and madmen, — that madmen put wrong ideas together, and so make wrong propositions, but argue and reason right from them; but idiots make very few or no propositions, and reason scarce at all.
Seite 113 - Hence it is, that no suit or action can be brought against the king, even in civil matters, because no court can have jurisdiction over him. For all jurisdiction implies superiority of power : authority to try would be vain and idle, without an authority to redress ; and the sentence of a court would be contemptible, unless that court had power to command the execution of it : but who, says Finch°, shall command the king?
Seite 438 - In fine, the defect in naturals seems to proceed from want of quickness, activity, and motion in the intellectual faculties, whereby they are deprived of reason ; whereas madmen, on the other side, seem to suffer by the other extreme. For they do not appear to me to have lost the faculty of reasoning; but, hav1ng joined together some ideas very wrongly, they mistake them for truths, and they err as men do that argue right from wrong principles.