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PENNSYLVANIA-Continued.

Pages.

Frame of government of Pennsylvania—1683....

1527-1531

Frame of government of Pennsylvania—1696.

7531-1536

Charter of privileges for Pennsylvania–1701....

1536-1540

Constitution of Pennsylvania–1776.

1540-1548

Constitution of Pennsylvania-1790....

1548-1557

Constitution of Pennsylvania—1838.......

1557–1570

Constitution of Pennsylvania—1873.........

1570-1593

RHODE ISLAND:

Patent for Providence Plantations— 1643.....

.... 1594-1595

Charter of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations-1663.

.. 1595-1603

Constitution of Rhode Island-1842 ......

1603-1613

Amendments to the constitution of 1842..

. 1613-1614

South CAROLINA:

Charter of Carolina—1663 ............

.... 1382-1390

Charter of Carolina—1665 ..............

1390-1397

Constitution of South Carolina-1776.

1615-1620

Constitution of South Carolina–1778....

1620-1627

Constitution of South Carolina-1790..

1628-1634

Amendments to the constitution of 1790........

1634-1636

Constitution of South Carolina-1865....

.. 1637-1645

Constitution of South Carolina-1868.......

1646–1663

TENNESSEE:

Act of Congress accepting the cession of Tennessee-1790...

1664-1667

Act of Congress establishing the territorial government south of the Ohio-1770.. 1667

Constitution of Tennessee-1796.........

1667-1677

Constitution of Tennessee-1834.

1677-1691

Amendments to the constitution of 1834 ........

1691-1694

Joint resolution of Congress restoring Tennessee to the Union—1866...... .... 1694

Constitution of Tennessee1870................

1694-1711

TEXAS:

Spanish claim of dominion in America--1492-'93 ....

304-365

Constitution of the Republic of Mexico-1824......

1712-1727

Constitution of Coahuila and Texas—1827......

1727-1747

Provisional constitution of Texas—1835........

1747-1752

Declaration of Texan independence-1836......

1752-1753

Executive ordinance of Texas-1836.......

1753-1754

Constitution of the Republic of Texas—1836....

1754-1763

Convention between the United States and Texas—1838.

1763-1765

Consent of Texas to annexation-1845 ...... ....

1765-1766

Constitution of Texas—1845 ..............

1767-1783

Joint resolution of Congress admitting Texas into the Union-

1783-1784

Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo with Mexico-1848

185-194

Constitution of Texas—1866 ..................

1784-1801

Constitution of Texas-1868........

1801-1822

Amendments to the constitution of 1868...

1822-1823

Constitution of Texas-1876 .........

...... 1824-1856

VERMONT:

Constitution of Vermont-1777.....

........................ 1857-1865

Constitution of Vermout-1786........

1866-1875

Act of Congress for the admission of Vermont into the Union—1791.....

1875

Constitution of Vermont-1793.........

1775-1882

Amendments to the constitution of 1793 ........

.... 1883–1887

VIRGINIA :

Grant to Sir Walter Raleigh-1584.........

1379-1382

The first charter of Virginia—1606. .......

...... 1888–1893

The second charter of Virginia--1609.......

1893-1902

VIP.GINIA-Continued.

Pages.
The third charter of Virginia—1611-'12 ........

1902–1908

Declaration of rights by Virginia—1776...

1908-1909

Constitution of Virginia—1776......

1910–1912

Constitution of Virginia—1830...

1912-1919

Constitution of Virginia—1850 ........

1919-1937

Constitution of Virginia—1864.....

1937-1951

Amendment to the constitution of 1864...

1952

Constitution of Virginia—1870 ....

1952–1974

Amendments to the constitution of 1870....

1974-1976

WEST VIRGINIA :

Constitution of West Virginia—1861-63.........

1977-1992

Amendment to the constitution of 1861-63.................

1992

Act of Congress for the admission of West Virginia-1862........

1992-1993
Joint resolution transferring territory to West Virginia—1866..

1993
Constitution of West Virginia—1872...........

1993-2019

WISCONSIN:

Act of cession by Virginia-1783......................................

427-428

Deed of cession from Virginia—1784.....

428

Act of Congress establishing the northwest territorial government-1787..... 429-432

Act of ratification by Virginia—1788......

433

Act of Congress establishing the northwest territorial government-1789....

433

Act of Congress establishing the territorial government of Indiana~1800-'og..... 434-436

Act of Congress enabling Illinois to become a State-1818...................... 436-438

Act of Congress establishing the territorial government of Wisconsin-1836...... 2021-2025

Act of Congress establishing the territorial government of Iowa—1838........... 528–533

Act of Congress enabling Wisconsin to become a State-1846................... 2025-2027

Constitution of Wisconsin—1848..........

2028–2047

Act of Congress for the admission of Wisconsin-1848.....

. 2047-2049

Amendments to the constitution of 1848.... ...........

2049-2050

THE ORGANIC LAWS

OF

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

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The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the Powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments

* The delegates of the United Colonies of New Hampshire; Massachusetts Bay; Rhode Island and Providence Plantations; Connecticut; New York; New Jersey; Pennsylvania; New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, in Delaware; Maryland; Virginia; North Carolina, and South Carolina, In Congress assembled at Philadelphia, Resolved on the ioth of May, 1776, to recommend to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies, where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs had been established, to adopt such a government as should, in the opinion of the representatives of the people, best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular, and of America in general. A preamble to this resolution, agreed to on the 15th of May, stated the intention to be totally to suppress the exercise of every kind of authority under the British crown. On the 7th of June, certain resolutions respecting independency were moved and seconded. On the roth of June, it was resolved, that a committee should be appointed to prepare a declaration to the following effect: “That the United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown; and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.” On the preceding day it was determined that the committee for preparing the declaration should consist of five, and they were chosen accordingly, in the following order : Mr. Jefferson, Mr. J. Adams, Mr. Franklin, Mr. Sherman, Mr. R. R. Livingston. On the rith of June, a resolution was passed to appoint a committee to prepare and digest the form of a confederation to be entered into between the colonies, and another committee to prepare a plan of treaties to be proposed to foreign powers. On the 12th of June, it was resolved, that a committee of Congress should be appointed by the name of a board of war and ordnance, to consist of five members. On the 25th of June, a declaration of the deputies of Pennsylvania, met in provincial conference, expressing their willingness to concur in a vote declaring the United Colonies free and independent States, wis laid before Congress and read. On the 28th of June, the committee appointed to prepare a declaration of independence brought in a draught, which was read, and ordered to lie on the table. On the Ist of July, a resolution of the convention of Maryland, passed the 28th of June, authorizing the deputies of that colony to concur in declaring the United Colonies free and independent States, was laid before Congress and read. On the samo day Congress resolved itself into a committee of the whole, to take into consideration the resolution respecting independency. On the 2d of July, a resolution declaring the colonies free and independent States, was adopted. A declaration to that effect was, on the same and the following days, taken into further consideration. Finally, on the 4th of July, the Declaration of Independence was agreed to, engrossed on paper, signed by John Hancock as President, and directed to be sent to the several assemblies, conventions, and committees, or councils of safety, and to the several commanding officers of the continental troops, and to be proclaimed in each of the United States, and at the head of the Army. It was also ordered to be entered upon the Journals of Congress, and on the 2d of August, a copy engrossed on parchment was signed by all but one of the fifty-six signers whose names are appended to it. That one was Matthew Thornton, of New Hampshire, who on taking his seat in November asked and obtained the privilege of signing it. Several who signed it on the 2d of August were absent when it was adopted on the 4th of July, but, approving of it, they thus signified their approbation.

Note.-The proof of this document as published above, was read by Mr. Ferdinand Jefferson, the Keeper of the Rolls at the Department of State, at Washington, who compared it with the fac-simile of the original in his custody. He says: “In the fac-simile, as in the original, the whole instrument runs on without a break, but dashes are mostly inserted. I have, in this copy, followed the arrangement of paragraphs adopted in the publication of the Declaration in the newspaper of John Dunlap, and as printed by him for the Congress, which printed copy is inserted in the original Journal of the old Congress. The same paragraphs are also made by the author, in the original draught preserved in the Department of State.”

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