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19. Bl. The K. R. Pawn one sq. Wh. The K. R. at its Q. Kt. sq.

20. Bl. The K. Rook at its 4th

sq., Wh. The Q. Bishop Pawn one sq.

21. Bl. The Q. Pawn one sq. Wh. The K. Pawn one sq.

22. Bl. The K. Kt. at his K.

sq. Wh. The Q. Kt. Pawn one sq.

23. Bl. The Q. B. Pawn takes the Pawn. Wh. The K. Rook takes the Pawn.

24. Bl. The Q. R. Pawn one sq. Wh. The K. Rook at his Q. Kt. 4th sq.

25. Bl. The K. B. Pawn one sq. Wh. The K. Bishop takes the Q. R. Pawn.

26. Bl. The Pawn takes the Bishop. Wh. The Queen takes the Pawn, and checks.

27. Bl. The King at his Q. sq. Wh. The Queen gives check.

28. Bl. The Knight covers the check. Wh. The Q. R. Pawn one sq.

29. Bl. The King at his Queen's 2d sq. Wh. The Queen takes the Q. Pawn and checks.

30. Bl. The King at his B. sq. Wh. The Q. R. Pawn one sq. and, by dif

ferent obvious ways, the wh. wins

the game.

205

FOURTH PARTY,

WITH

TWO BACK GAMES.

1. Bl. The K. Pawn 2 sq. . Wh. The same.

2.

Bl. The Q. B. Pawn one sq. (a)
Wh. The Q. Pawn 2 sq

3.

Bl.: The Pawn takes the Pawn.
Wh. The Queen takes the Pawn.

4.
Bl. The Q. Pawn one sq. (6)
Wh. The K. B. Pawn 2 sq.

(a) This (unless one is sure of playing with a bungler) is ill played, because the move is lost by the adversary pushing the queen's pawn two squares: the attack going on the other side, very probably the game will also; for, when once the move is lost, it is very difficult to regain it with good players. 'Tis true, if you were to neglect pushing your queen's páwn he would lock up all your game with his pawns.

(6) If he had played his king's knight at his king's second square you must have pushed your king's pawn

5.

Bl. The K. B. Pawn 2 sq. (c)
Wh. The K. Pawn one sq. (d)

6.
Bl. The Q. Pawn one sq. (e)
Wh. The Queen at her K. B. 2d

7. Bl. The Q. Bishop at his K. 3d sq. Wh. The K. Knight at his B. 3d sq.

8. Bl. The Q. Knight at his Q. 2d sq.

sq.

forwards, and sustained it with your king's bishop's pawn.

(c) If he had played his queen's bishop at his king's third square, you must have played your king's bishop at his queen's third square, and the situation of the game would have been in this case exactly as it is at the sixth move of the second party (vide p. 178). But if he had attacked your queen with his queen’s bishop's pawn, he would have lost the game; because the pawn that formed the vanguard on his queen's side is left behind (vide (1) the eighteenth move of the Third Party p. 193). A back game will better clear this situation, and the progress of it.

(d) See Rule E. 2.

(e) If he had taken your king's pawn, you must have taken his queen, and afterwards his pawn : thus hindering him from castling, you preserve the attack upon him. But had he played his queen at her bishop's second square, you would have played according to the second back game.

Wh. The K. Knight at his Q. 4th sq.

9. Bl. The K. Bishop at his Q. B. 4th sq. Wh. The Q. B. Pawn one sq.

10. Bl. The Queen at her Kt. 3d sq. Wh. The Q. Bishop at his K. 3d sq.

11. Bl. The K. Bishop takes the Knight. Wh. The Pawn takes the Bishop. (f)

12. Bl. The K. Knight at his K. 2d

sq. Wh. The K. Bishop at his Q. 3d sq.

13. Bl. The King castles with his Rook. Wh. The K. R. Pawn one sq.

14. Bl. The Queen at her B. 2d sq. (8) Wh. The K. Kt. Pawn 2

sq.

15. BI. The K. Kt. Pawn one sq. Wh. The same. (h)

f) See Rule A 9.

(8) Being now of no use in that place, he removes her to make room for his

pawns. (h) The pushing of this Pawn obstructs his game the more: your king's rook's pawn who is to follow it will

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