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27. Wh. The K. Knight at his Q. Kt. 3d sq. Bl. The Q. B. Pawn one sq.

28. Wh. The Q. Bishop gives check. Bl. The King at his Q. Kt. 2d sq.

29. Wh. The K. Kt. checks at the bl. Q. B. 4th sq. Bl. The K. Bishop takes the Knight.

30. Wh. The Q. Bishop takes the Bishop. Bl. The Queen at her B. sq.

31. Wh. The Rook at his Q. Kt. sq. Bl. The King at his Q. B. 2d sq.

32. Wh. The Q. Bishop checks at the bl. Q. 3d sq. Bl. The King at his Q. sq.

33. Wh. Queen checks at the bl. Q. Kt. 3d sq. Bl. The King any where, loses the game.

189

THIRD PARTY, *

WITH

THREE BACK GAMES.

BEGINNING WITH THE BLACK.

1.

Bl. The K. Pawn 2

sq. Wh. The same.

2. Bl. The K. Knight at his B. 3d sq. Wh. The Q. Pawn one sq.

3. Bl. The K. Bishop at the Q. B. 4th sq. Wh. The K. B. Pawn 2 sq. (a)

* By this party it is shewn, that playing the king's knight the second move is entirely wrong, because it not only loses the attack, but gives it to the adversary. It will be seen likewise by three back games, that a good attack keeps the defender always embarrassed.

(a) Any thing else your adversary could have played this was your best move, it being advantageous to change your king's bishop's pawn for his king's pawn; because your royal pawns place themselves in the middle of the board, and stop the progress of your adversary's pieces ; besides, you gain the attack upon him, and that

4. Bl. The Q. Pawn one sq. Wh. The Q. B. Pawn one sq.

5. Bl. The K. Pawn takes the Pawn (6) 61 Wh. The Q. Bishop takes the Pawn.

6. Bl. The Q. Bishop at the wh. K. Kt. 4th sq. Wh. The K. Knight at his B. 3d

7. Bl. The Q. Knight at his Q. 2d sq. Wh. The Q. Pawn one sq.

sq. (0)

by his having thus played his king's knight. You have still another advantage, by losing your king's bishop's pawn for his king's pawn, which is, when you do castle with your king's rook, the same rook finds itself immediately free and fit for action. This will be seen by the first back game.

(6) If he refuses taking your pawn, leave it in the same place exposed, except he should castle with his king's rook, in such case without any hesitation, or the interval of a single move, push it forwards in order to attack his king with all the pawns of your right wing. The effect of it will be learned by the second back game. See also Rule A. 3.

(c) If he takes your knight, take his bishop with your pawn, which being joined to his comrades increases the strength of your game.

8. Bl. The K. Bishop at his Q. Kt. 3d sq. Wh. The K. Bishop at his Q. 3d sq. (d)

9. Bl. The Queen at her K. 2d sq. Wh. The same.

10. Bl. The King castles with his Rook (e) 43 Wh. The Q. Knight at his Q. 2d sq. :

11.

Bl. The K. Knight at his R. 4th sq. (f) Wh. The Queen at her K. 3d sq.

12. Bl. The K. Knight takes the Q. Bishop.(8)

(d) This is the best square your king's bishop can chuse, except his queen's bishop's 4th; particularly when you have the attack, and it be out of your adversary's power to hinder that bishop from playing on his king's bishop's pawn.

(e) If he had castled on his queen's side, it would have been your play to castle on your king's side, in order to attack him more commodiously with your pawns on the left. This attack at your left will be seen by the third back game, and see Rule C. 2.

(f) To make room for his king's bishop's pawn, with a design to advance it two squares, to break the chain of your pawns.

(8) If, instead of this, he had pushed his king's bi

Wh. The Queen takes the Knight.

13. Bl. The Q. Bishop takes the Knight. (h) Wh. The Pawn takes the Bishop.

14. Bl. The K. B. Pawn 2 sq. Wh. The Queen at her K. Kt. 3d sq. .

15. Bl. The K. B. Pawn takes the Pawn. Wh. The K. B. Pawn takes it.

16. Bl. The K. Rook at its K. B. 3d sq.(*) Wh. The K. R. Pawn 2

sq. (k)

shop's pawn, you must then have attacked his queen with your queen’s bishop, and pushed your king's rook's pawn the next move upon his bishop, to force him to take your knight ; then your best way, as before, would be then to take his bishop with your pawn, in order the better to support your king's pawn, and replace it in case it be taken.

(h) If he did not take your knight his bishop would remain imprisoned by your pawns, or he would lose at least three moves to get him free, which are sufficient to spoil his game.

(2) He plays this rook, either to double it or to remove your queen.

(k) To give your queen more room, which being attacked can retire behind this pawn, and then remain

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