Abbildungen der Seite
PDF

unvaried rule of his actions, has given it to me in particular charge, to assure his faithful subjects of Ireland, of the continuance of his paternal regard and affection for them; and 1 am persuaded, that in all your proceedings, you will continue to manifest that uniform attention to the publi; good, of which his Majesty's own conduct affords the bell and mast illustrious example.

As every addition to his Majesty's royal family adds strength 10 that happy succession, which is the great secjrity to all that is valuable to us, I have a particular pleasure in communicating to you the birth of another prince since your iall fesiion of parliament.

Gentlemen of the House of
Commons,

I have ordered the proper officers to lay before you the public accounts and estimates, from which you will be folly acquainted with the circumllances of this country, and may be enabled to form a true judgment of the provisions necessary to be made for the honourable support of Ids Majesty's government. I have his Majesty's commands to ask the supplies necessary for this purpose; and I am confident you will grant them in such a manner, as will be least burthentbme to his Majesty's subjects of this kingdom: on my part, you may rest lecure that they stall be faithfully applied, and frugally administered.

My Lords and Gentlemen, The laws of your country will naturally present themselves as the first and most important objects of your consideration. It is my duty to cali your particular attention to foch as respect the leligion and morals, thesecuiity and good order

of the p'ople. It is in vain that Jaws are roajc for the punilhment of offenders, unless'their morals can be reformed, and their minds impressed with principles of virtue.

Y,our Protestant charter-schools, the seminaries of true religion and industry, deserve your particular Consideration; and your linen manufacture, the great source of wealth to the nation, is tn object of the highest importance. You will consider whether any new laws may be wanting to improve, reguiace, and extend this most beneficial trade; or to support its reputation at foreign markets.

1 am firmly persuaded that we are met t ^getlier animated with the satm intentions of maintaining the honour and dignity of his Majesty's government, and of promoting the good of this kingdom. Your conduct has convinced me, that 1 shall receive from you the fullest proois of your loyalty and attachrae.it to the King, and of your zeal in the public iervice: mine, I trust, will shew that s have nothing more sincerely at heart than the welfare and prosperity of Ireland.

The Addresses of both Houses of Parliament ///Ireland to bis Majejiy.

To the King's mijl excellent Muj'Jly.

The Humble Address of the Lords Spiritual and •Jims oral in Parliament assembled. Most gracious Sovereign,

WE, your Majesty's most dutilul and loyal subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in parliament assembled, humbly beg leave to assure your Majesty, that we have the most lively fense of the many bleiiings we enjoy under

the

the mild, just, and auspicious government of your Majesty, who have made the happiness of your people the constant object of your wishes; the unvaried rule of your actions.— Permit us, with the greatest gratitude, to express our most unfeigned acknowledgments for the continuance of your Majesty's paternal regard and affection for your faithful subjects of this kingdom; and your Majesty may rest assired, that in all our proceedings we will continue to manifest that uniform attention to the public good, of which your Majesty's conduct affords the best and most illustrious example.

Truly sensible of the many and great blessings we enjoy under so excellent a Sovereign, considering eve^ry addition to your Majesty's royal family as strengthening that happy succession, which is the great security of all that is valuable to us, and feeling the most sincere pleasure from each new source os your domestic felicity, we humbly offer our warmeit congratulations, upon the birth of another prince.

We cannot have a stronger assurance of your Majesty's attention to the happiness and prosperity of this kingdom, than by your gracious appointment of Earl Harcourt to be our chief governor, of whole distinguished virtues and abilities your Majesty, from your earliest years, hath had uniform experience.

We (hall prove by our conduct, that we do not differ from your Majesty, and the world, in a full and cordial reliance upon his Excellency's wisdom, justice, and moderation.

Fully persuaded that the best and most effectual method to recommend ourselves to your Majesty's favour

is, and ever will be, to promote the true interest of your peop!e, we . shall not neglect to pay due attention to the laws of our country, particularly to those which respect the religion and morals, the security and good order of the people; convinces that u llcss their morals be reformed, and their minds impressed with principles of virtue, laws for the punishment ot offenders are made in vain.

The Protestant charter-schools, those seminaries of true religion and industry, shall receive our particular consideration; the linen manufacture, that great source of our national wealth, is an object of the highest importance; we shall give our utmost attention to the forming of any laws that may be wanting to improve, regulate, or extend this most beneficial trade, or to support its reputation at foreign markets.

Your Majesty may be assured, that we will manifest a true and unbiassed regard to the public welfare, by that unanimity in all our proceedings which conduces to the e?le of your Majesty's government, so essentially necessary to the interest of Ireland.

May the Divine Goodness long preserve to your people the blessings of your Majesty's auspicious reign, and lonu may we give your Majesty the satisfaction of governing the hearts of a generous and loyal people.

'To the King's most excellent Majesty.

The humble Address of the Knights, Citizens, and Burgejses, in Parliament affembled.

Most gracious Sovereign,

WE, your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, .the Commons Commons of Ireland in parliament assembled, beg leave to approach your sacred person, with the warned professions of our just fense of the many blessings we enjoy under the mild, just, and auspicious government of so spacious a sovereign, who has made the happiness of his people the constant object of his wishes, and the unvaried rale of his actions; and- wich the most grateful acknowledgments for the continual.ce of your Majesty's paternal regard and affections for your faithiul subjects of this kingdom.

Your Majesty has given us a conspicuous instance of your gracious attention to the happiness and prosperity of Ireland, by sparing from your councils, and leading to preside over us, a chief governor, who, having long had the honour to be placed near your sacred person, and under the influence .of your royal example, must be particularly acquainted with your Majesty's benign purposes for the happiness of your people, and ,to have derived from that great source those virtues and talents which are peculiarly adapted to diffuse and secure the blessings of good government, and of constitutional liberty.

Under the conduct and administration of a no'oleman of the most distinguished character, whose public and private virtues give a lustre to his high station, we shall be pe^_ culiarly happy in continuing to manifest that uniform attention to the public good, of which your Majesty's conduct has set the most illustrious example.

We humbly offer rur warmest congratulations to your Majesty qpon the happy event of the birth

of another prince, thoroughly sensible that every addition to your Majesty's royal family adds strength to that happy succession, which is the grt-ac security of all that is valuable tr> us, and to which your Majesty's loyal subjects of Ireland, from the unhed motives of gratitude and interelt, have at all times shewn the most Heady and inviolate attachment.

Conscious of the happiness which we have enjoyed under the belt of princes, we ihall xhearfully grant, as far as the prese:u state and circumstances of our country will admit, and in the manner least burthensometo your Majesty's subjects, the supplies necessary for the honourab.e snpp?rt or your Majesty's government; convinced that in properly maintaining the honour and dignity of government, we effectually promote the good of our country.

Satisfied that penal, laws for the reformation of the people are insufficient, unless their morals can be reformed, and their minds impressed with principles of virtue, we shall direct our particular attention to such laws as willex:end the influence of religion, improve the morals, and promote the security and good order of the prople.

Our Protestant charter-schools shall receive from us the consideration due to seminaries of true religion and industry; and v.e shall, without delay, prepare any new laws that may be wanting to improve, regulate, or extend our linen manufacture.

Your Majesty may be thoroughly persuaded, that your faithful Commons, as representatives of your Majesty's dutiful and affectionatesubjects of Ireland, are animated

with with the strongest desire to maintain the honour and dignity of your Majesty's government; and we sliall, upon every occasion, give unquestionable proofs ot our zeal for the public service, and of our never-failing loyalty and attachment to your Majelly's most sacred person.

Dublin Castle, Nov. 1. His Majesty has been pleased to return the following most gracious answers to the humble Addresses of the Houses of Lords and Commons.

G E o R c E R.

"His Majesty returns his thanks '« to the House of Lords for their "very loyal address The strong "assurances they give of their duty "' and affection to his Majesty and "his royal family, have given his "Majesty the greatest satisfaction; "and as his Majesty, from the ex"perienced zeal of the House of *' Lords, has the firmest reliance "on their applying themselves di"ligently to promote the happiness "and prosperity os his subjects of "Ireland, they may be assured of "his Majesty's constant favour and "protection." G. R.

Gbokge R.

"His Majesty thanks the House "of Commons for their unani** mous and loyal address. No"thing could be more acceptable "to his Majesty than this fresh "mark of their duty and affection "to his Majesty, -and his royal "fataily.

** His Majesty donbts not but "his faithful Commons will chear*' fully grant the necessary supplies *' for the support of his govern

"ment with honour; and they "may be assured of his Majesty's "concurrence in such measures as "may belt contribute to the wel•■ fare and prosperity of the king"dom of Ireland." G. R.

Die Martis, Die Novem. 1773. Resolved by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in parliament assembled. That the humble thanks of this House shall be returned to his Majesty, for his Majesty's most gracious answer to the Address of this House of the I ?ch day of October lalh

Ordered, That the Lord Chancellor do attend his Excellency the Lord-Lieutenant with the said resolution, and desire his Excellency will please to lay the same before his Majesty.

To the King's most excellent Majesty.

The bumble Address of jhe Knights, Citizens, and Buvgejjes in Parlia

ment assembled.

Most gracious Sovereign,.

WE, your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Common:; of Ireland in. parliament assembled, return your Majesty our wannest thanks for your Majesty's most gracious Answer to the Address of this House.

We will chearsully grant the necessary supplies lor the support os government with honour, as far as the present state and circumstances of the coantty will admit, being truly sensible of your Majesty's paternal regard for us, from the sC; furances given us of your Majesty's concurrence in such measures as may best contribute to the welfare and prosperity of Ireland, and from

our our happy experience of your Majetty's mild and gracious government.

The Addresses of both Hou/ei of ParHainan in Ireland, to bis Excellency the Lord-Lieutenant.

To bis Excellency Simon Earl Harcourt. Lord Lieutenant - General, and General-Governor of Ireland.

The bumble Address of the Lads Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled.

May it please your Excellency,

WE, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, in parliament assembled, return your Excellency our molt sincere thanks for your speech from the throne to both houses of parliament.

We esteem ourselves particularly happy in the satisfaction which your Excellency has been pleased to express at the meeting us in parliament, and doubt not of your concurring with us in every measure that may promote the real Interest of this kingdom; and we beg leave to assure your Excellency, that the satisfaction is sincerely mutual on our part.

Your Excellency's great abilities, which have received the highest marks of approbation from the many important trusts which in successive reigns, and various administrations, have been reposed in you, give us the molt lively hopes of every benefi; which can result from a steady, prudent, and benign, administrations

The assurances which your Excellency has given us of the continuance of his Majesty's paternal

regard for his faithful subjects of Ireland, fills us with the warmest sentiments of duty and gratitude; and vve cannot too much acknowledge the gracious manifestation of his Majesty's goodness towards us, in committing the government of this kingdom to a nobleman, whose name has stood unsullied through the many high offices he has silled.

We are most thankful to your Excellency for the joyful information you have been pleased to give us of the increase of the domellic happiness of our amiable Sovereign, and the stability added to his illustrious house by the birth of another priuce, descended from him with whom the welfare of these kingdoms is so necessarily connected.

Your Excellency's wise and seasonable advice in directing our attention towards such laws as respect the religion and morals, the security and good order of the people, cannot fail to animate our endeavours to do every thing on our part to procure so desirable an end, and to take into consideration what new laws may be necessary, as well for that purpose as also for the extending and improving our linen manufacture, that great source of wealth to this nation:

The favourable sentiments that your Excellency is pleased to conceive of us, gives us the most sincere pleasure, and we can have no doubt, that the proofs we shall afford of our loyalty and attachment to the King, and of our zeal for the public service, will be faithfully and impartially represented by your Excellency to his Majesty, so as to preserve to us his favourable opinion and royal protection. And we flatter ourselves, that there will be that unanimity in all our deliberations,

« ZurückWeiter »