Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

65

quo tenera irato flere puella potest.
sed manibus qui saevus erit, scutumque sudemque

is gerat et miti sit procul a Venere.
at nobis, Pax alma, veni spicamque teneto,

perfluat et pomis candidus ante sinus.

LIBER SECVNDVS

I

Quisquis adest, faveat: fruges lustramus et agros,

ritus ut a prisco traditus extat avo.

68. perfluat w prefluat AV profluat G. on the common formula, terque led editors to suppose the poet to quaterque ; cf. 3, 3, 26; Verg. Aen. refer to the Sementivae, or Paga1, 94.

nalia, celebrated in January; cf. 65. scutumque . . . gerat: i.e. Ovid, Fast. I, 657-680; Fowler, let him rather than me go to war. Rom. Fest., pp. 294 sqq. But the

67. Representations of Pax poet is more commonly supposed (found mostly on coins) commonly to be describing the Ambarvalia. have not only an olive branch and Cf. Fowler, Rom. Fest., pp. 124 sqq. a cornucopia, but also a bundle of Cf. also Fowler, Class. Rev., Vol. ears of corn in one hand. - teneto: 22 (1908), pp. 37-40. Besides the the colloquial impv. in -to without public festival of the Ambarvalia, special fut. force. Cf. PAPA., celebrated annually in May, every Vol. 26 (1895), p. Ixi.

Roman possessor of a farm used 68. ante : adv. of place.

to perform similar rites of purification for his own fields and crops

about the last of April or first of 2, I

May. The name of the festival As different Roman stivals is derived from the custom of leadhad certain features in common, it ing thrice around the estate (arva is not always easy to decide posi- and ambire) the sacrificial victim tively which occasion may be in or victims before slaying them. the mind of a poet like Vergil or At the greater celebration the vicTibullus. Some of the features tims were a boar, a ram, and a bull in the following description have (snovetaurilia); but private citi

Bacche, veni, dulcisque tuis e cornibus uva

pendeat, et spicis tempora cinge, Ceres.
luce sacra requiescat humus, requiescat arator,

et grave suspenso vomere cesset opus.

5

zens might employ the lesser suo- Cupid, too, they say, is a child of vetaurilia (pig, lamb, calf), or the fields. How skillful and bold offer only one of these. The di- he has grown! Neither old man, vinities especially worshiped were youth, nor maid is safe from his Mars (in early times), Ceres, and darts. Yet happy he who wins his Bacchus. This description of the favor! Come then, Cupid, to the Ambarvalia must have been writ- feast, but leave thy quiver behind. ten after 27 B.C. (cf. v. 33), per- Invoke, friends, the favor of this haps the next spring. Another God for the flocks; for yourself picture of the same festival may too, if you will. Make merry! for be seen in Verg. Georg. 1, 338 night comes on apace.' sqq. For a modern description 1. faveat : sc. lingua, i.e. let see Walter Pater's Marius the no inauspicious word fall. Cf. 2, 2, Epicurean, pp. 3 sqq.

I; Hor. Car. 3, 1, 2: favete lin1-14: Invitation to the feast : guis. — fruges lustramus : i.e. by • Keep silence all ! Come, Bac- anticipation. chus ! Come, Ceres ! This is a 3. cornibus: Bacchus was somesacred day, a day of rest for man times represented with horns, as and beast. Come purified to the an emblem of power and abunsacred altars! 15-26: The sol- dance (cf. cornucopia); cf. Baum. emn procession advances. · Gods Denk., p. 435; Prop. 3, 17, 19: of my father, accept this offering, per te et tua cornua, vivam ; Hor. defend field and fock, and grant Car. 2, 19, 29: te vidit insons prosperity to my estate. Lo! the Cerberus aureo cornu decorum; prayer is heard. 27-36: Now let K. P. H. in AJA., Vol. 5 (1901), us enjoy the festal banquet, and p. 7. drink our fill; and while each spicis ... cinge: the wreath pledges thy health, Messalla, come of ears of corn was a stated attrithyself and inspire my song of bute of Ceres ; cf. I, I, 15; 1, 10, praise. 37–66: My theme is agri- 22; Hor. Car. Saec. 30: spicea culture and its gods. They taught donet Cererem corona. Baum. men to lead a civilized life. How

Denk., p. 417. delightful is rustic life, with its

die.
- 5 899.:

cf. plenty and its joys!

Hence came Ovid, Fast. 1,663-665. the drama, the forms of worship, suspenso : so slight and simand the art of weaving. 67-90: ple an affair was the ancient plow

5. luce

IO

solvite vincla iugis: nunc ad praesepia debent

plena coronato stare boves capite.
omnia sint operata deo: non audeat ulla

lanificam pensis inposuisse manum.
vos quoque abesse procul iubeo, discedat ab aris,

cui tulit hesterna gaudia nocte Venus.
casta placent superis : pura cum veste venite

et manibus puris sumite fontis aquam.
cernite, fulgentes ut eat sacer agnus ad aras

vinctaque post olea candida turba comas.
di patrii, purgamus agros, purgamus agrestes:

15

II.

(for a description see Verg. Georg. to ulla ; nullus is quite often di1, 169-175) that this word is liter- vided in poetry. — ulla : sc. puella; ally correct. The plow was often cf. 1, 3, 87. Woman's work is to hung on a limb in the same posi- stop, as well as man's. tion as that of a scythe to-day. 10. lanificam: a poetic adjec

7. iugis: the team,” just as we tive, perhaps first found in this say, “a yoke of oxen.” Best con- passage. sidered as a dat. ; for the connec

vos: explained by the foltion shows that everything is to lowing clause, where the construcbe done on this occasion for the tion changes; for a similar change comfort and well-being of the from plural to singular, cf. I, 6, cattle, as well as that of their 39: tim procul absitis, quisquis owners. This does not prevent

colit arte capillos. the emphasizing of the idea of 14. fontis : only living water separation in translation. Cf. A would do for purposes of purifi229; H. 427.

cation. 8. Wreathing of cattle was 15. agnus: the victim had been practiced not merely when the led three times around the farm, animals were

to be sacrificed. and is now about to be sacrificed. One of the most familiar decora- 16. candida : cf. 1, 10, 27. – tive features in art is garlanded turba : the whole familia, agrestes, ox skulls.

etc. 9. operata : “be performed in 17. di patrii: indefinite honor of,' i.e. ápraise '; cf. v. 65; term, including doubtless Mars, 2, 5, 95; Prop. 2, 28, 45; Verg. Bacchus, and Ceres, and all others Georg. 1, 339.

non: instead of under whose protection the anthe regular ne, because it belongs cestral estate had hitherto thrived.

an

20

vos mala de nostris pellite limitibus,
neu seges eludat messem fallacibus herbis,

neu timeat celeres tardior agna lupos.
tum nitidus plenis confisus rusticus agris

ingeret ardenti grandia ligna foco, turbaque vernarum, saturi bona signa coloni,

ludet et ex virgis extruet ante casas.
eventura precor: viden ut felicibus extis

significet placidos nuntia fibra deos?
nunc mihi fumosos veteris proferte Falernos

25

18. pellite: 'avert’: used in- ibus ; Ovid, Fast. 3, 528: e ramis stead of the obsolete averruncare frondea facta casa est; Class. of the ancient formula.

Rev., Vol. 22 (1908), p. 39. 19. eludat: originally a gladi- 25. extis : including theoretiatorial term, to 'parry'an enemy's cally the liver, heart, lungs, gall, thrust; hence to disappoint. and caul of the victims; but we We should have expected mes- need not suppose that a minute sorem ; but the crop' is repre- examination was made, if there sented as disappointed because were signs of a propitious omen. it cannot fulfill its promise. 26. fibra: here in the proper herbis: the green blades which signification of the filament termake only a fair show.

minating the exta ; often by syn21. tum : in that case,' i.e. if ecdoche for exta itself, as in 1, 8, my prayers are granted. — nitidus : 3: nec mihi sunt sortes nec conscia trim.

fibra deorum. 22. Cf. Hor. Epod. 2, 43: 27. fumosos: wine was comsacrum vetustis exstruat lignis monly left in a fumarium, or focum.

smoke-chamber, where it gathered 24. ante: adverb, sc. fores. a flavor much relished by the casas : leafy bowers such as were ancients; cf. Ovid, Fast. 5, 518: often woven together on festal oc- fumose condita vina cado. B. G., casions, in which to enjoy the

p. 489

Falernos : sc. cados. luxuries of idleness and wine- Falernian and Chian wines are drinking. Cf. 2, 5, 97 ; Pervigi- types of the choicest vintages, lium Ven. 6–7: inter umbras native and foreign. As the arborum inplicat casas virentis former was acid and the latter de flagello myrteo : Copa 8: et sweet, they were favorites for triclia umbrosis frigida harundin- mixing. Cf. Intr. $ 42, I (4).

IO

solvite vincla iugis: nunc ad praesepia debent

plena coronato stare boves capite.
omnia sint operata deo: non audeat ulla

lanificam pensis inposuisse manum.
vos quoque abesse procul iubeo, discedat ab aris,

cui tulit hesterna gaudia nocte Venus.
casta placent superis : pura cum veste venite

et manibus puris sumite fontis aquam.
cernite, fulgentes ut eat sacer agnus ad aras

vinctaque post olea candida turba comas.
di patrii, purgamus agros, purgamus agrestes:

15

owners.

(for a description see Verg. Georg. to ulla ; nullus is quite often di1, 169-175) that this word is liter- vided in poetry. — ulla : sc. puella ; ally correct. The plow was often cf. 1, 3, 87. Woman's work is to hung on a limb in the same posi

stop, as well as man's. tion as that of a scythe to-day. 10. lanificam: a poetic adjee

7. iugis: “the team,' just as we tive, perhaps first found in ti say, “a yoke of oxen" Best con- passage. sidered as a dat.; for the connec

11. vos: explained by the ! tion shows that everything is to lowing clause, where the cons be done on this occasion for the tion changes; for a similar (! comfort and well-being of the from plural to singular, cf cattle, as well as that of their 39: tiim procul absitis, This does not prevent

colit arte capillos. the emphasizing of the idea of 14. fontis : only livi separation in translation. Cf. A would do for purposes 229; H. 427

cation. 8. Wreathing of cattle was

15. agnus: the vi practiced not merely when the led three times aro animals were

to be sacrificed. and is now about 1 One of the most familiar decora- 16. candida : tive features in art is garlanded turba : the whole ox skulls.

etc. 9. Operata : be performed in 17. di patri honor of,' i.e. • praise '; cf. v. 65; term, including 2, 5, 95; Prop. 2, 28, 45; Verg, Bacchus, ami Georg. I, 339. non: instead of

under who the regular ne, because it belongs cestrales

[graphic]
« ZurückWeiter »