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We see no great Matter in Dr. Fiddes's Some Reflec

tions thereon. long supposititious Disquisition on the Cardinal's kneeling in the Dirt, &c. (See p. 472, in his Life of the Cardinal) no more than in Mr. Salmon's Observations on the Doctor, in his History of Henry the VIIIth. Though we cannot suppose he was really

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from CARDINAL WOLSEY's Time. created Earl of Macclesfield; be- and fined 30,000 l. which he . ing allowed by all a Nobleman paid; and the Money, by his latë of great Abilities. Whilst his Majesty K. George the Itt's DirecLordship presided in this Court tion, was applied towards making it was discovered that much of the good the Deficiency occasioned Suitors Money was misapplied, in- by the Officers Insolvency. Howfomuch that some of the Officers, ever, we cannot omit here to give as it afterwards appeared, were Mr. Collins's Character of his . unable to make good the Sums. Lordship; • The Earl, as a Hufcommitted to their Trust by the band, a Parent, and a Master, Court; though often brought there, 'was truly beloved by every one not by the Choice of the Parties con- « who stood in those Reiations to cerned, but by the Compulfion of the 'wards him. His Speeches on Court, under the Pretext of better • publick Affairs, and in his juSecurity. † This drew on an In- 'dicial Capacity, shewed both quiry first before the King and • his Learning and Eloquence, Council, next in the Honourable and he favoured all Designs tendHoufe of Commons, which pro- ing to the Advancement of Learnduced an Impeachment against .. ing. No Man served his Friends the noble Earl; and, to encou- more readily, and chearfully ; rage such of the Masters in Chan- • and they found in him a most cery, who had purchased I their • agreeable, innocent, and inOffices, to make a Discovery structive Companion. He was touching what they had paid for a fincere and faithful Member the fame, an Act passed to in- ' of the Church of England, condemnify them from the Forfei- ' ftantly frequenting its Affemtures incurred by the Statute made blies, and joining in all its Of. in Edward the VIth's Time. In ' fices with a juft Sense of Relishort, the Earl was tried at the gion, and an exemplary Piety. Bar of the House of Lords, upon

• To those Supports it was owing, the Impeachment, found guilty, that, when he apprehended the

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+ See the Speech of the Right Hon, Arthur Onslow, Esq; on the Trial of the Earl of Macclesfield.

I See the said Trial.
Vol. IV.

PP

bethinking himself of what would be acceptable to the King, he sent him his Fool, Patch, whom six of his tallest Yeomen were scarce able to conduct, so great a Reluctance he had to part with his old Master ; but with this Present the King appeared very much pleased.

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MEMOIRS of the LORD CHANCELLORS, &C. our Counsel at Law, whom Whereupon the Lord we a second time called to be Cowper was a second time

1741. • our Attorney General, which appointed Lord High Chancellor, • Office he had once before suf

(and was the only Chancellor that • tained with Honour, as far as held the Seal twice) who was • it was thought convenient ; created Earl Cowper. • whom lastly, lince we perceiv- This is his Character from Mr. • ed all those Things were in- Collins. · In all his Stations he act. • ferior to the Largeness of his • ed with strict Integrity ; and it

Capacity, we have advanced ' is to his great Honour that he • to the highest Pitch of Foren- • refused the New-years-gifts, fical Dignity, and made him • (which former Lord Chancel. supreme Judge in our Court of " lors received from the Council) Equity, where he still conti

thinking it an ill Precedent, • nues to deserve higher of us, tending to Corruption. He • and of all good Men; and is had a graceful Person and win• so much a brighter Ornament • ning Aspect ; and all his

to his Province, as it is more • Speeches were delivered with • honourable than the rest he has that Eloquence, learning and gone through. He daily dif

• Judgment, as made him uni• patches the Multitude of Suits versally applauded, and shewed

in Chancery, he removes the • he had no Superior in the Know• Obstacles which delay Judg. ledge of the Law, or any other • ment in that Court, and takes Subject he applied himself to.' special Care that the successful

His Lordship died in Hert• Iflue of an honest Cause should fordshire, on the 13th of O&t. every Plaintiff as little as

1723, was succeeded by his may be ; which Things, as eldest Son William, now Earl • they are very grateful to us, Cowper, who married on the • honourable to himself, and 27th of June, 1732, the Lady

beneficial to the Common- Henrietta, youngest Daughter of • wealth, we think deserving of the Right Hon. Henry the prehigher Reward. Therefore, sent Earl of Grantham, by whom • &c. But, upon the Accession he hath Issue one Son and a of King George the Iit, his Lord Daughter. ship was removed from his high May the 12th, the Lord Station --See fome Account of his Parker was declared Lord 1718. Lordship's Family, Vol.II.p. 283. Chancellor, and was soon after

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We see no great Matter in Dr. Fiddes's Some Reflec

tions thereon. long supposititious Disquisition on the Cardinal's kneeling in the Dirt, &c. (See p. 472, in his Life of the Cardinal) no more than in Mr. Salmon's Observations on the Doctor, in his History of Henry the VIIIth. Though we cannot suppose he was really

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from CARDINAL Wolsey's Time. created Earl of Macclesfield; be- and fined 30,000 l. which he ing allowed by all a Nobleman paid; and the Money, by his late of great Abilities. Whilft his Majesty K. George the It's DirecLordship presided in this Court tion, was applied towards making it was discovered that much of the good the Deficiency occasioned Suitors Money was misapplied, in- by the Officers Insolvency. Howfomuch that some of the Officers, ever, we cannot omit here to give as it afterwards appeared, were Mr. Collins's Character of his unable to make good the Sums. Lordship; · The Earl, as a Hufcommitted to their Trust by the • band, a Parent, and a Master, Court; though often brought there, was truly beloved by every one not by the Choice of the Parties con- o who stood in those Reiations to cerned, but by the Compulfion of the 'wards him. His Speeches on Court, under the Pretext of better publick Affairs, and in his juSecurity. + This drew on an In- 'dicial Capacity, shewed both quiry first before the King and • his Learning and Eloquence, Council, next in the Honourable and he favoured all Designs tendHoufe of Commons, which pro- ing to the Advancement of Learnduced an Impeachment against ing: No Man served his Friends the noble Earl; and, to encou- * more readily, and chearfully ; rage fuch of the Masters in Chan- ' and they found in him a moit cery, who had purchased I their agreeable, innocent, and inOffices, to make a Discovery 'structive Companion. He was touching what they had paid for a sincere and faithful Member the same, an Act passed to in- of the Church of England, condemnify them from the Forfei- ' ftantly frequenting its Affemtures incurred by the Statute made • blics, and joining in all its Ofin Edward the V Ith's Time. In • fices with a juft Sense of Relishort, the Earl was tried at the 'gion, and an exemplary Piety. Bar of the House of Lords, upon - To those Supports it was owing, the Impeachment, found guilty, chat, when he apprehended the

Ap+ See the Speech of the Right Hon, Arthur Onflow, Esq; on the Trial of the Earl of Macclesfield.

I See the said Trial.
Vol. IV.

PP

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in the Dirt, or on his Knees, scarce two Minutes, what a Pother have Bishop. Burnet, Rapin, and others, made about it, and at last settled nothing. And sup

pose MEMOIRS of the LORD CHANCELLORS, &c. 1. Approach of Death, he pre- • sters should forthwith pass and

pared himself for it with as ! settle their Accounts.' Where.

much Calmness and Compo- by it soon appeared, if some fur! sure as for a Journey: And, ther Provision was not made, for • having received the holy Com- the Reliefof the Suitors, befides the • munion, in the Company of his 30,000l. paid by the Earlof Mac

Relations, Friends, and Ser- clesfield, many of them would be ľ vants, he took his last Farewel greatly reduced, who were Wi

of them serious and unmoved ; dows and Orphans, and in some

setting them a Pattern of dying, Cafes their All depending ; which ç as he had always done of liv. might bring the Dignity of the • ing, like a true Christian. Up- Court into Difesteem, if not a on his Lordship's Death he was a Reproach on the Constitusucceeded in Honour and Estate tion. This put the Parliament by his Son the present Right upon taking the Matter into Hon. George Earl of Macclesfield. their serious Confideration, which

Upon the E. of Macclef- had this Iffue, an Act passed, $725. field's resigning the Great 12 George I. entitled, An Aa for Seal it was, in Jan. committed to the Relief of the Suitars of the Court the Care of Sir Joseph Jekyll, Mr. of Chancery. Justice Raymond, and Mr. Baron une the 21st, the Gilbert, with the Title of Lords Great Seal was committed 1725. Commissioners. Their Lordships, to Lord Chief Juftice King, with as was consistent to the great the Title of Lord Chancellor ; Truft, immediately set a- who, on the 4th of Nov. made bout reforming the Abuses that an Order greatly for the Benefit had crept into this Court, and of the Suitors of the Court, and the Masters in Chancery chear foon afterwards an A& paffed, fully affifted their Lordships in 12 Gea. I. entitled, An As for the this useful Work, and readily o- better securing the Moneys and Ef beyed such Orders as were thought' feets of the Suitors of the Court of requisite for the better securing Chancery; wherein the Order made the Suitors Money and Effects, by his Lordship was verbatim jes particularly one, bearing Date forth and confirmed. the 26th of May, 1725, where, The Provisions which the Par, by their Lordships ordered, “That liament made for the Relief of all the Moneys, Securities, &c. the unhappy Suitors were such belonging to the Suitcrs of the as intirely answered the End

Court, in the Hands of the proposed, and gave universal & Masters, should be carried into Content to the Nation in general; the Bank ; and that the Ma- and for their further Ease an Act

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pose it were determinable, which we do not see it is, whether he was religiously respectful to the King as the Lord's Anointed, or fond of being again car

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from CARDIÑAL Wolsey's Time. lately passed, to exempt the Suiters, endeavours to prove, That tors from paying the Accomptant the Master of the Rolls was no General Fees on his Reports, for Judge, either in Law or Equibringing their Moneys, &c. in- ty ; but what Judicial Power to the Bank, or receiving them • he could lawfully exercise was therefrom, pursuant to fuch Or- by being one of the XII Maders as the Court should make * fters of Chancery, or by Virfrom time to time.

tue of the King's Commission." During the Time his Lord- - The Controversy being drawn ship presided in this Court a to this Length, in order to prevent Dispute arose; Whether the Master anyInconvenience to the Publick; of the Rolls had a Judicial Autho- an Act passed, 3 George II. entitled, rity to hear Caufes in the Absence of An A. to put an end to certain she Lord Chancellor, without a Com- Disputes, touching Orders and Demillion ? -This Matter was in- trees made in the Court of Chantroduced to the Publick in a Book cery, in which was recited, printed in Trinity Term, 1726, That whereas divers Questions under the Title of The Hiftory of and Disputes had arisen, touchthe Chancery, wherein the Au- ing the Authority of the Master thor asserts, " That his Honour of the Rolls in the High Court o could not hear Causes in Court of Chancery, for putting an • without a Delagation from the • end to all Disputes concerning • Chancellot, unless by Commis- • the same; it was enacted, That • fion: An Answer to this was • all Orders and Decrees made

published, entitled, A Discourse by the then present Master of the of the Judicial Authority belong Rolls, or any of his predecef

ing to the Office of the Master of 'fors, or any thereafter to be the Rolls ; wherein the Author • made by the said Master of the affirms, That the Master of the Rolls, or any of his successors, Rolls could hear Causes, and (except such Orders and Decrees • make Orders in Chancery, by as should be made only by the • Virtue of his Office, without ** Lord Chancellor, &c.) shall

any special Commission: And, be deemed and taken to be vain Support of his Argument, sets " lid Orders by the said Court, forth many Cafes. This produced subject nevertheless to be disanother Piece by way of Reply, charged, revoked, or altered said to be wrote by one of by the Lord Chancellor, &c. the Masters of the Court, enti- . And that no such Order or Detled, The Legal I udicature in cree should be inrolled, till the Chancery flated; and herein the • fame be first signed by the Lord Gentleman, among other Mat- • Chancellor, &ri'

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