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cellent Judges of the Beauty and Pleasantness of the Country, and always chose the best to settle in. It was more especially so in this of Hampton, being finely situated close to the River, yet not offended by the

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The Orange Trees and fine the Eye, the vacant Ground Dutch Bays were placed within which was large, is very hapthe Arches of the fine Building pily cast into a Wilderness, with under the first Floor; so that the a Labyrinth and Efpaliers 10 high, lower Part was a Green-house that they effectually take off all for some Time. Here stand, ad- that Part of the old Building, vanced on two Pedestals of Stone, which would have been ofensive two Marble Vases or Flower- to the Sight. Pots of most beautiful Workman- The Labyrinth and Wilderness ship, the one done by an English- are not only well designed and man, and the other by a Ger- compleatly finished, but perfectly man; and it is hard to say which well kept, and the Espaliers are is the best Performance, though filled to the very Ground, and the working of them was for a led up to proportioned Heights ;

a Trial of Skill, and give us room, fo that nothing of that Kind can without any Partiality, to appre- be more beautiful. hend they were both Masters of

The Palace itself is every way their Art.

answerable on the Outside to a The Parterre on that Side de- pleasing Prospect, and the two scends from the Terras-walk by Fronts are the larget, and, beSteps ; and on the left a Terras yond Comparison, the finest of goes down to the Water-side, o- the Kind in Great Britain. verlooking the Garden on the The great Stairs go up from Eastward Front, and affords a the second Court of the Palace a moft pleasant Prospect. on the Right-hand, and lead you

The fine Scrolls and Brodure to the South Prospect. of these Gardens were at first King William brought into edged with Box : But, on the England the Love of fine PaintQueen’s dilliking those Edges,' ings, (as well as that of fire they were taken up; yet they Gardens) and you have an Exhave since been planted again, ample of it in the Cartoons, as at least in many places ; nothing they are called, being five Pieces perhaps making so fair and re- of such Paintings as are not to be gular an Edging as Box, or so foon matched in Europe. The Stories brought to Perfection.

of them are known, but especi. On the North Side of the Pa. ally two of them, viz, that of lace, where the Gardens seemed · St. Paul preaching on Mars Hill, to want kreening from the Wea- to the self-wise Athenians, and ther, or the View of the Chapel, that of St. Peter passing Sentence and some Part of the old Build- on Ananias, on which his Deatta ing required to be covered from immediately ensued. Vol. IV.

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Rising of its Waters in Floods and Storms, nor affected with any Foulness thereof at the Flowing and Ebbing of the Tide ; for which Reason, though the Gardens extend almost to the Banks of the River, yet they are never overflowed ; nor are there any Marshes on either Side to make the Waters stagnate, or the Air unwholsome; the River being deep enough to be navigable, has a lively Stream, (looks always chearful, not now and Neepy like a Pond) which keeps the Waters ever clean, the Bottom in View, and the Fish playing in Sight : In a Word, it has every thing that makes an inland River pleasant, agreeable, and profitable.

Hampton-court lies about two little Miles from Kingfton upon Thames, and,

as the Road from Stanes to Kingston streightened the Park a little, they were obliged, in the Cardinal's Time, to part the Parks, and leave the Paddock and the great Park on the other Side of the Road ; a Testimony of his Regard for the common Good, the Service of the Country ; * and

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* To show the Cardinal. was ' men and Farmers had good strictly right, in not digiting the Houses and good Farms interPeople, by turning the Course of mingled with those Waftes, of the common Roads or High- • their own Inheritance, or for ways, and how

wrong

those must • their Lives, or Years; and withbe, who have at any time made out taking of them into the Attempts of that Kind, take the • Park it would not be of the following Relation from the great • Largeness, or for the Use proLordi Clarendon's History of the posed : His Majesty desired to Rebellion, Vol. I. p. 100.

purchase those Lands, and was • The King, (Charles thelli) very willing to buy them upon who was excessively afficted to higher Terms than the People • Hunting and the Sports of the • could fell them at to any body

Field, had a great Desire to else, if they had Occasion to • inake a great Park for Red as part with them, and thought • well as Fallow Deer, between • it no unreasonable Thing upon Richmond and Hampton-court, those 'Terms to expect this from • where he had large Waftes of his • his Subjects; and so he employ

own, and great Parcels of Wood, ed his own Surveyor and other « which made it very fit for the of his Officers, to treat with • Use he designed it to; but, as • the Owners, many whereof • fome Parishes had Commons in

were his own Tenants, whose * those Wastes, fo

many
Gentle- • Farms would at last expire.

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that he wouli not, to gratify his Pleasure, interrupt the Course of the Road, or cause the poor People to B b 2

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• The major part of the People Upon which Cottington thought were in a short time prevailed,

• fit to acquiesce. with, but many very obstinately The building the Wall be• refused ; and a Gentleman, who • fore People consented to part « had the best Estate, with a con- with their Lands, or their Con

venient House and Gardens, mon, looked to them as if by • would by no means part with it; • degrees they should be put out

and the King being as earnest to from both, and increased the compass it, it made a great Noile, Murmur and Noise of the Peo• as if the King would take away ple who were not concerned, as

Men's Estates at his own Plea- I well as of chem who were ; and • sure. The Bishop of London,

• it was too near London not to (Juxton) who was Treasurer, • be the common Discourse. The • and the Lord Cottington, Chian- 'Archbishop (Laud) who (de• cellor of the Exchequer, were, 'sired exceedingly that the King • from the first entering upon it, • should be poffeffed as much of * very averse from the Design, not the Hearts of the People as was • only for the Murmur of the • possible, at least that they should • People, but because the Purchase • have no juft Cause to complain)

of the Land, and the making a meeting with it, resolved to • Brick-wall about so large a Par-speak with the King about it,

cel of Ground, (for it is near ten " which he did, and received such • Miles about) would cost a greater an Answer from him, that he • Sum of Money than they could thought his Majesty rather not

easily provide, or than they informed enough of the Inçon

thought ought to be sacrificed to veniencies and Mischiefs of the • such an Occasion ; and the Lord Thing, than positively resolved

Cottington, who was more folli. not to desist from it. Where. cited by the Country People, upon one Day he took the Lord: (and heard most of their Mur- Cottington aside (being informed murs) took the Business most to • that he disliked it, and, accord. heart, and endeavoured by all ing to his natural Cufton, (pake the Ways he could, and by fre- * with great Warmth against it) quent Importunities, to divert and told him, “He should do

• • his Majesty from pursuing it, “ very well to give the King and put all Delays he could good Counsel and to withdraw • well do in the Bargains which “ him from a Resolution, in

were to be made ; till the King “ which his Honour and Justice grew very angry with him and

was so much called in que• told him, • He was resolved to ftion." Cortington answered him “ go through with it, and had * very gravely, “That the Thing " already caused Brick to be “ designed was very lawful, and “ burned, and much of the Wall “ he thought the King resolved to be built upon his own Land.” very well, since the Place lay

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go out of the Way of their Business, to and from the adjoining Market-towns and Villages : Which cer

tainly, “ fo conveniently for his Winter- Health, might be thought, for “ exercise ; and that he should by ;

“ought he knew, guilty of “ it not to be compelled to make “ the highest Crimes." Upon " so long Journeys, as he used • which the Archbishop, in great “ to do, in that Season of the Rage and with

many Re“ Year, for his Sport; and that 'proaches, left him ; and either

; “no Body ought to dissuade presently, or upon the next OpHi him from it.”

fortunity, told the King, “That The Archbishop, instead of " he now knew who was his great finding a Concurrence from him “ Counsellor for making his

as he expeEted, seeing himself Park, and that he did not * reproached upon the Matter for « wonder that Men durft not re• his Opinion, grew into much "present any Argument to the • Paffion, telling him, “Such contrary, or let his Majesty " Men as he would ruin the " know how much he suffered in

King, and make him lole the “it, when such Principles in Die “ Affection of his Subjects ; that, “ vinity and Law, were laid 66 for his own Part, as he had “ down to terrify them.” And so

began, lo he would go on, to "recounted to him the Confe“ dissuade the King from pro- "rence he had with the Lord Cat, “ceeding in so ill a Counsel, and tington, bitterly inveighing a" that he hoped it would appear gainst him and his Doctrine, “ who had been his Counsellor.” mentioning him with all the

Cottington, glad to see him so harp Reproaches imaginable, • foon hot, and resolved to inflame and beseeching his Majeity, • him more, very calmly replied “ That his Counsel might not to him, “ That he thought a prevail with him;" taking

; “ Man could not, with a good « fome 'Pains to make his ConConscience, hinder the King 'clusions appear very false and

• “ from pursuing his Resolution ridiculous. " and that it could not but pro- • The King said no more, but, u ceed from want of Affection to My Lord, you are deceived, “ his Person, and he was not sure Cottington is too hard for you, " that it might not be High Trea. upon my Word ; he hath not 6c son."

only dissuaded me more, and • The other, upon the Wild- given me more Reasons against • ness of his Discourse, in great " this Bufiness, than all the Men Anger asked him, Why? " in

“ in England have done, but hath « from whence he had received “ really obstructed the Work, os that Doctrine?”. • He said by his not doing his Duty as I « with the faine Temper, “ They “ commanded him, for which I os who did not wish the King's “ have been very much displeaf " Health could not love him, “ed with him ; you see how un" and they who went about juftly your Passion hath trans

to hinder his taking Recrea- ported you.” By which Represe tior, which preserved his "hension he found how much he

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tainly, when rightly considered, must greatly recommend his Memory with Honour ; and, with Pleasure we can say it, since this Palace has come into Royal Hands no Step has been taken to interrupt the Course of the Road in that Part of the Country: A noble Example worthy of Imitation.

Archbishop Warham, at the beginning The Cardinal's of this Year, was so extreamly ill, that Care of Archb.

Warham. he was not capable of going abroad, so that several Letters and Messages passed

1528. between him and Cardinal Wolsey, from which it fully appears, that he expressed great Tenderness and Care for his Conftitution, and offered him the Use of a handsome Apartment in his pleasant Palace at Hampton-court, before he made a Present of it to the King, believing the Change of Air might help to recover him to his former good State of Health. This and other Favours the Archbishop acknowledged in the strongest Terms.

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had been abused, and resented it * « To the most Rev. Father in accordingly.'

God, and my very fingular Notwithstanding all that could good Lord, Cardinal of York, be said, the Park was inclosed in Legate de Latere, bis good King Charles the It's Reign,

" Grace. and continues so to this Day, and is now closer shut up than at LEASE IT YOUR GRACE the beginning ; for no Persons to understand, that I have are permitted to pass through it • hitherto deferred to make an without producing Tickets, of • Answer unto your Grace's last which few or none are delivered • Letters, because I had thought, to the Inhabitants thereabouts. Itrait after Christmas, to have Many have thought that the ' waited on your Grace, and to first Inclosing this Park was the • have communed with the same Fore-runner of the melancho- • in divers Matters, which Sick-' ly Consequences that followed, • ness will not suffer me so to do, which we fall draw a Vail o- • unless I should do contrary to ver, referring our Readers to

• the Advice of my Physicians, Lord Clarendon's History for and put myself in Jeopardy; the further Particulars of the • nevertheless, if God send me Transactions of those unhappy any Amendment, I purpose to Times.'

give Attendance on your Grace

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