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above a Year's Imprifonment. Dr. Fiddes says, “ That when King Francis was exchanged, and found « himself at full Liberty in his own Country, he im“ mediately mounted a swift Horse, and, putting “ Spurs to him, rode with Precipitation, and express“ ed himself after a Manner, rather discovering an " excessive Transport of Joy, than becoming the Ma

jesty and Sedateness of so great a Prince : For he “ broke out into this Exclamation, I am a King! I am a King! designing thereby to declare, that he

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By George Cavendish, Esq; the Lords had done, but I an- ' the Queen : This Matter was « fwered I would never consent very narrowly scanned on that

to any such Act, for it was Side, and to prove the carnal • much against my Conscience, Copulation, they had many • and therefore my Hand and « Reasons and Similitudes of . Seal shall never be set to such Truth ; and being answered • an Instrument, (God willing) negatively again on the other

with many other Words to Side, it seemed that all their • that Purpose. You fay Truth, former Allegations were doubt• quoth the Bishop of Canter. * ful to be tried, and that no bury, such Words you used,

“ Man knew.

Yes, quoth the • but you were fully resolved at Bishop of Rochester, I know « the last, that I should subscribe the Truth.

How can you your Name, and put to your know the Truth, quoth the • Seal, and you would allow of Cardinal, more than any other o the same. All which, quoth Person? Yes, forsooth, my • the Bishop of Rochester, under Lords, quoth he, I know that

Correction, my Lord, is un- God is the Truth itself, and • true. Well, quoth the King, never faith but Truth, and he we will not stand in Argument

faith thus, Quos Deos conjunxit, • with you, you are but one : Homo non separet : And foraf• And so the King arose up,

much as this Marriage was ç and the Court was adjourned joined and made by God to a ' until the next Day, at which good Intent, therefore I faid

Time the Cardinals fat again, ' I knew the Truth, and that : and the Counsel on both Sides • Man cannot break upon any § were there present to answer. o wilful Action that which God

• The King's Counsel alledged • hath made and constituted. the Matrimony not good nor

. So much do all faithful Men lawful at the Beginning: Be- ' know, quoth my Lord Cardis cause of the carnal Copulation 'nal, as well as you, therefore ? chat Prince Arthur þad with this Reason is not sufficient in

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“ had now recovered the Freedom of a crowned “ Head ; or, as others have inferred from the Event, “ that, being now at full Liberty, he should not think “ himself bound to perform a Treaty, which he only “ submitted to through Constraint. We may

here see, that even great Men, when under Misfortunes, tho' they have enjoyed the utmost Grandeur of the World, find it very difficult to maintain that portly Dignity becoming them. No sooner was the French King returned into his

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The SecrET HISTORY of the CARDINAL, • this Cafe ; for the King's Coun- • and Day to Day, till a certain * sel do alledge many Presump- ' Day the King sent for the Car• tions to prove that it was not ' dinal to Bridewell, who went • lawful at the Beginning, Ergo, • into the Privy-chamber to him, • it was not ordained by God; ' where he was about an Hour, • for God doth nothing without • and then departed from the

a good End. Therefore it is King and went to Westminster • • not to be doubted, but if the in his Barge, the Bishop of

' • Presumptions be true, which

Carlisle being with him said, they alledge to be moit true, . It is a hot Day To-day: Yea, • then the Conjunction neither quoth the Cardinal, if you had

was nor could be of God. been as well chafed as I have • Therefore, I say unto you, my

s been within this Hour, you • Lord of Rochester, you know • would fay you were very hot.

not the Truth, unless you can My Lord' no sooner came o avoid their Presumptions upon

• home but he went to Bed, • juft Reasons.

( where he had not lain above Then, quoth Dr. Ridley, It two Hours, but my Lord of . is a great Shame and Disho- Wiltshire, Mistress Anine Bula nour to this honourable Pre

loigne's Father, came to speak • sence, that such Presumptions with him from the King : My

• • should be alledged in this open Lord commanded he should be • Court. What! quoth my

Lord • brought to his Bed-fide, who • Cardinal, Domine Doctor Reve- • told him it was the King's rende. No, my Lord, there • Mind he should forthwith go

belongs no Reverence to this with the Cardinal to the Queen, • Matter, for an unreverent Mat- • being then at Bridewell in her • ter may be unreverently an-Chamber, and to persuade her • swered, and so left off ; and through their Wisdoms to put • then they proceeded to other " the whole Matter into the « Matters. Thus passed this • King's own Hands, by her $ Court from Session to Seffion, Consent, which should be much

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Dominions, but the King of England sent Sir Thomas
Chency and Dr. Taylor, to congratulate him upon the
Occasion, and to see whether he was ready to ratify
the Treaties made with the Lady Regent during his
Captivity.

Francis received these Ambassadors with great Refpect, readily ratified the Treaties, acknowledged the great Obligations he was under to the King of England, for his Assistance in gaining his Liberty, and sent his Majesty a folemn Ambaffy, in order to lay

before By George CAVENDISH, Esq; • better for her Honour, than they came to speak with the • stand to the Tryal at Law, and Queen's Grace, who told the

thereby be condemned, which Queen the Cardinals r would tend much to her Dis- come to speak with her ; then ! honour and Discredit.

• The arose up having a Skain To perform the King's Plea- • of red Silk about her Neck, (be< sure, my Lord said he was . ing at work with her Maids) « ready, and so prepared to go. • and came to the Cardinals, • But, quoth he further to my • where they staid attending her • Lord of Wiltshire, you and • Coming; at whose Approach, o others of the Council have • quoth the, Alack, my Lords,

put Fancies into the Head of • I am sorry that you have at• the King, whereby you trou- • tended on me so long, what is « ble all the Realm ; but at the your

Pleasures with me? If it length you will get but small please your Grace, quoth the • Thanks both of God and the • Cardinal, to go to your Privy« World, * with many other ear- « Chamber, we will shew you • nelt Words and Reasons, which • the Cause of our Coming. • did cause my Lord of Wiltshire · My Lord, said she, if you

to be silent kneeling by my • have any thing to say to me, • Lord's Bed-side, and in Con- speak it openly before all these • clufion departed.

• Folk, for I fear nothing that . And then my Lord rose and you can say to me or againft • took his Barge and went to me, but that I am willing all

Bath-house to Cardinal Cam- the World should both fee and ' paine's, and so went together • hear it, and therefore speak to Bridewell to the Queen's your Minds openly.

Lodgings ; she being then in • Then began my Lord to • her Chamber of Presence, they speak to her in Latin. Nay, « told the Gentleman-usher that • good my Lord, speak to me

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* This shews plain, that the Cardinal was not such a Time-serving Perfon as some would represent, who had the Spirit to answer Anne Bulleyn's Father in this open and candid Manner.

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before him the Articles of the Treaty he had concluded with the Emperor.

Francis also, by a Letter to Cardinal Wolsey, wrote with his own Hand, acknowledged, that the King and his Eminency had been the chief Instruments of procuring his Enlargement.

Cardinal Wolley, upon this Occasion, discovered his usual Address and Fineffe of Policy, in the Instructions drawn up for these Ambassadors ; in which they were directed to represent to Francis the amicable

Interview

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The Secret History of the CARDINAL, • in English, quoth she, although Thip here, in a foreign Region ; • I do understand some Latin : ' and your Counsel also I hould • Forsooth, quoth my Lord, good be glad to hear, and therewith ,

• • Madam, if it please your Grace, • she took my Lord by the Hand, « we come both to know your • and led him into her Privy• Mind what you are disposed · Chamber, with the other Car• to do in this Matter, and also • dinal, where they staid - to declare to you secretly our • while, and I heard her Voice • Counsels and Opinions, which • loud, but what she said I know

we do for very Zeal and Obe- not. • dience to your Grace.

• 'This done, they went to the • ,

• My Lords, quoth she, I • King, and made a Relation • thank you for your Good-wills, • unto him of the Passages be

but to make answer to your • tween the Queen and them, • Requests, I cannot so suddenly; • and so they departed. • for I was set amongst my • This strange Case proceeded, • Maids at work, little thinking and went forwards from Court• of any such Matter, wherein • day to Court-day, until it came • is requisite fome Deliberation, • to that, that every Man ex

and a better Head than mine • pected to hear Judgment given, to make Answer ; for I need o at which Time all their Pro• Counsel in this Case, which 'ceedings were openly read in

meso near ; and Latin. That done, the King's • Friends here I have none; they « Counsel at the Bar moved for

are in Spain, in my own Coun- Judgment : Quoth Cardinal try : Also, my Lords, I am Campaine, I will

not give Judga poor Woman of too weak ment until I have related the

Capacity, to answer such noble whole Proceedings to the Pope, « Persons of Wisdom as you are, whose Counsel and Command• in so weighty a Matter. And ment I will in this Case ob6. therefore be good to me, a

serye: The Matter is too high « . Woman deftitute of Friend for us to give hafty Judgment,

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amicable Interview that had been between the two Kings in the Year 1520; and to acquaint his Majesty, “ That “ the intimate Friendship then contracted had made so

deep and lasting an Impreffion in the Mind of the

King, their Master, that the Accidents which had “ since intervened had not defaced : That the King “ often reflected with much Pleasure on those friendly

Offices, which had at that Time passed between them:

That he could not be satisfied, afterhis Return into his Dominions, until he had sent to him: That the Con“ finement he had been under had indeed rendered a Vi

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By George CAVENDISH, Esq; considering the Persons and the high Dignity and Authority • doubtful Occasions alledged, within his Realm ; and, we be• and also whose Commissioners ing both his Subjects, the thinks we are, by whose Authority we will not do her Justice :

"And therefore, to avoid all these • It is good Reason, therefore, Ambiguities, I adjourn the " that we make our chief Lord our • Court for the Time, according • Counsel in the fame, before we to the Court of Rome, from

proceed to Judgment definitive. ! whence our Jurisdiction is deI came not to please for any

• rived : For, if we should go Favour, Reward, or Fear of • further than our Commission

any Person alive, be he King • doth warrant us, it were but a or otherwise ; I have no such Folly and blame-worthy ; be

Respect to the Person, that I ! cause then we shall be Breakers • should offend my Conscience ; • of the Orders from whom we ' and the Party Defendant will • have (as I said) our Authority • make no Answer here, but ra

• derived. And so the Court was •ther doth appeal from us. I

• diffolved and no more done. am an old Man, both weak • Thereufon, by the King's • and fickly, and look every

• Commandment, Itept up the Day for Death. What shall • Duke of Suffolk, and with a • it avail me to put my Soul • haughty Countenance uttered ' in Danger of God's Displea

" thele Words : • sure to my utter Damnation, It was never thus in Eng• for the Favour of any Prince • land until we had Cardinals • in this World ? My being amongst us. Which Words • here is only to see Justice ad- • were set forth with such Vehe• ministered according to my mency,

that all Men marvel. • Conscience.

led what he intended, the Duke • The Defendant supposeth • further expressing some opprothat

we be not indifferent obrious Words. • Judges, considering the King's My Lord Cardinal perceivVol. IV.

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