The Practice of Angling: Particularly as Regards Ireland, Band 1

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W. Curry, jun.,, 1845
 

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Seite 33 - A little neglect may breed great mischief: for want of a nail the shoe was lost ; for want of a shoe the horse was lost ; and for want of a horse the rider was lost, being overtaken and slain by the enemy ; all for want of a little care about a horse-shoe nail.
Seite 62 - ... but observe that after rising he may possibly drop down a yard or so,, in which case, you must lengthen your line a little, or fall down a step ; if he should not then take, let him alone for about five minutes, and change your fly to one of a somewhat smaller size, and not so gaudy as the one you commenced with ; try him again, but do not dog him ; three or four casts will determine whether he will take or not. If the river is narrow, and that you can get over to the off side, throw from thence,...
Seite 63 - ... have you. I have witnessed the most decided success from this method, both in my own case and in that of others with whom I have angled, and who have tried this practice. " If all fails at that time, and that you purpose returning to where you had risen him, which may not be much out of your way, let him, alone, till, in the common phrase, the sun goes back of him, for in the early spring, 'tis full time to commence at ten AM.
Seite 318 - But these examples yield to what he said he witnessed on Dromore. A large pike having been hooked and nearly exhausted, was suddenly seized in the water and carried to the bottom. Every effort was made for nearly half an hour to bring this enormous fish to shore, but to no purpose ; at length, however, by making a noise with the oars and pulling at the line, the anglers succeeded. On getting up the pike which they had been playing, it was all torn as if by a large dog...
Seite 315 - The small trout, the salmon-fry, a small herring, the tail of an eel spangled and tinselled, are excellent" [bait, as well as the frog] ; "so is a small-sized jack, and sometimes a good-sized one; so is a goldfinch, a swallow, or a yellow» hammer." And so on with the " so is" ad infinilum. No doubt, if a man was to put on a horse's head, or a sheep's paunch, he would kill some extraordinary beast or another, that the local paper would bray about, and a set of semi-barbarians wash down with whiskey-and-water....
Seite 306 - There is no breeze upon the fern, Nor ripple on the lake, Upon her eyry nods the erne, The deer has sought the brake ; The small birds will not sing aloud, The springing trout lies still, So darkly glooms yon thunder cloud, That swathes, as with a purple shroud, Benledi's distant hill.
Seite 315 - Exactly. It is proposed by the Epicurean, and seconded by the O'Gorman, that the pike should be destroyed in every practicable way, and that it is not a kind of fishing a man can care about. Carried unanimously. Again says our friend — " The small trout, the salmon-fry, a small herring, the tail of an eel spangled and tinselled, are excellent" [bait, as well as the frog] ; " so is a small-sized jack, and sometimes a good-sized one; so is a goldfinch, a swallow, or a yellow* hammer.'' And so on...
Seite 122 - ... chief boatman, requested that I would wheel up the lines, and then walked deliberately to the river. I asked what he was about, when he replied, that he was going to shave himself; and so he did, having lathered himself with a boiled potato — and, such a razor ! By the time the operation was over, his face was scarified like a crimped salmon. When he saw my flies, he regarded them with the utmost contempt, declaring that they were much too small and light, and offering one or two of his own,...
Seite 90 - I was stopped by a very large drain, at the other side of which was a high steep bank, partially planted with quicks. This was a boundary between two farms. You will soon perceive the reason of my being so particular : I was obliged to walk a considerable way round, before I could get across, after which I continued along the bank, till under Castle Troy, where I saw two men fishing in a boat, whom I hailed, and they very civilly came to shore. They were dragging for salmon — which mode of angling...

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