Of the Origin and Progress of Language

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Georg Olms Verlag, 1774 - 590 Seiten
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Inhalt

PART
1
Ch
18
General plan of this ſecond part of
26
Of the noun and its threefold diviſion
36
Of pronouns The neceſſity of invent
43
Of the article and the various uſes
53
Of the uſe of the article in French
75
Gh
86
Of rhythm in general and the divi
301
Continuation of the ſubject of quantity
329
Introduction
337
The difference betwixt the arrange
344
Objection to the anțient compoſition
353
of language And firſt of
366
Of the compoſition of Jyllables into
373
Of the compoſition of accents in the
379

Of the verb commonly ſo called
117
Of tenſes
125
Continuation of the fame fibject
149
Of the modes perſons numbers
161
Of participles adjectives prepoſitions
173
Diviſion of words into primitive
182
Whether words are by nature fignifi
194
Pag
202
BOOK II
222
The analyſis of articulate founds into
228
Of alphabetical characters That
242
Of the antient accents That they
269
not much different from the Engliſh
401
Djf xhe compoſition of quantity and
407
The concluſion of the ſubject
420
Of the Chineſe language The moſt
426
Of the philoſophical language invent
440
That a language of art muſt have
483
Concluſion of the ſecond part
507
Dife
513
Of the found of the Greek language
543
Of the compoſition of the antients
555
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Seite 179 - S« and yt, of which laft it is very difficult to afcertain the precife meaning : but it certainly has a meaning ; and a man much converfant in the Attic writers will defiderate it, if it be any where wanting.
Seite 395 - POE T's PRAYER. IF e'er in thy fight I found -favour, Apollo, Defend me from all the difafters which follow : From the knaves and the fools, and the fops of the time, From the drudges in profe, and the triflers in rhyme : From the patch-work and toils of the royal fack-bibber, Thofe dead birth-day odes, and the farces of GIBBER : From fervile attendance on men in high places...
Seite 389 - Lear. Pray, do not mock me * : I am a very foolifh fond old man, Fourfcore and upward * ; and, to deal plainly, I fear, I am not in my perfeft mind 5.
Seite 388 - I think, more than any other of our poets, fometimes breaks the meafure of the verfe altogether ; as in this line : " Burnt after him to the bottomlefs pit." Nor are we to imagine, that Milton did this through negligence, or as not knowing the nature of the verfe he ufed ; but it was to give a variety to his verfe, and fome relief to the ear, which might otherwife be tired with the conftant repetition of the fame meafure. It is for this reafon that we have, both in Homer and Virgil, irregularities...
Seite 71 - Peripatetic fchool. . eel as the genus of the fpecies ; and the Ch. 6. meaning of the propofition is, that man participates of the general idea of animal. The idea therefore of animal, is more general than that of man, which is comprehended under it ; fo that it is impoffible we can affirm the whole genus animal of man, any more than we can affirm the whole fpecies man of any individual. For though we can fay, Sax^arnc \<n...
Seite 162 - I hold it to be no mood, though it be commonly called fo ; becaufe it exprefTes no energy of the mind of the fpeaker,, but fimply the action of the verb, with the addition of time. It is therefore either ufed as a noun, or it ferves to connect the verb, with ano• When this conditional or relative affirmation is a contingency dependent upon will or inclination, the...
Seite 40 - Of this third kind of noun there are fome fpeciefes which deferve particular notice. And firft, there is one of them made by joining the article to the infinitive of a verb ; for the nature of this mood being to denote the action of the verb fimply, with the addition only of time, but without any expreffion, either of perfon, or of the affection of the mind of the fpeaker, by the article being prefixed it becomes a noun, having all the variety of cafes which nouns have, and being like them made the...

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