Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

LA BELLE DAME SANS MERCI
Jolin Keats

"She found me
sweet,

And honey wild, and manna-dew, And sure in language strange she said

'I love thee true.'

O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge has wither'd from the
lake,

And no birds sing,

[blocks in formation]

"I hastened, as soon as the wedding was done,

And left my wife in the porch. 50 But i' faith, she had been wiser than me,

For she took a bottle to Church."

"I set her on my pacing steed,
And nothing else saw all day long,
For sideways would she lean, and
sing
A faery's song.

roots of relish

25

[blocks in formation]

1

IMITATION BALLADS FOR OPTIONAL READING 1 Note.-Report on at least seven imitation ballads. Give author and central thought of each. With what degree of success did the author catch the genuine ballad spirit and subject-matter? In what particulars did he fail? Which of these ballads read seemed to you to be the best imitation?

"The Battle of Agincourt".

"John Gilpin's Ride".

"The True Ballad of Charitie," from "The Rowley Papers"

"The Bristowe Tragedie," from "The Rowley Papers"

"The De'il's Awa' wi' the Exciseman".

"The Battle of Blenheim".

"The Inchcape Rock".

"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner",

"Jock o' Hazeldean"..

"Lochinvar"

"The Outlaw”.

"Border Ballad".

"Alice Brand" (from "Lady of the Lake")

"The Maid of Neidpath".

"The Eve of St. John".

"The Rover".

"Madge Wildfire's Song"
"Casabianca"

"Hale in the Bush, 1776”.
"The Battle of the Kegs".
"Horatius at the Bridge"
"The Ballad of Nathan Hale".
"Lord Ullin's Daughter".
"The Sands of Dee".
"The Three Fishers".
"Driving Home the Cows".

"Herve Riel"...

"How They Brought the Good News".

"A Musical Instrument".
"The Revenge".

"The Forsaken Merman".
"The Captain's Daughter".
"Jock Johnstone the Tinkler".
"The Wreck of the Hesperus"
"The Skeleton in Armor"...

Michael Drayton . Cowper

. Chatterton

Chatterton

.Burns

Southey
Southey

Coleridge

. Scott

. Scott

Scott

Scott

Scott

Scott

.Scott

.Scott

.Scott

.Mrs. Hemans

Anon.

Francis Hopkinson

Macaulay

Anon.

Thomas Campbell

.Kingsley

Kingsley

Osgood

Browning
Browning

Mrs. Browning

Tennyson

Matthew Arnold

Fields

James Hogg

..Longfellow
.Longfellow

1 These ballads may be found in general collections of English and American poetry or in connection with the author's works.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

"The Ballad of Father Gilligan". "The Fiddler of Dooney".

"Burial Party" (from "Salt Water Ballads")
"Bill" (from "Salt Water Ballads")..
"Harbour Bar" (from "Salt Water Ballads")
"The Turn of the Tide" (from "Salt Water

Ballads")

"Cape Horn Gospel I" (
(from "Salt Water

Ballads")

"The Cremation of Sam McGee",

"Ballad of Manila Bay".

"Soldier, Soldier"

"Ballad of Lieutenant Miles". "Langemarck at Ypres".

REVIEW

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Kipling

.Kipling

Wm. Butler Yeats

.Wm. Butler Yeats
Masefield

Masefield

Masefield

.Masefield

Masefield
Service

C. G. D. Roberts
Maurice Hewlett

Clinton Scollard
Wilfred Campbell

1. Sum up what you have learned regarding the ballad. 2. What special interest have you found in ballads? Have you caught something of their charm? Can you make yourselves look sympathetically at life through the eyes of the ballad singers? 3. Do you see why it is hard to write successful imitation ballads? What authors, have you found, wrote them with the nearest approach to success?

CHAPTER IV

THE METRICAL TALE

Characteristics of the Metrical Tale. The metrical tale is a narrative poem, usually so short that it can be read easily at one sitting. It leaves a single impression with the reader. It is not so long as the metrical romance, and not so fanciful, and it deals with any emotion or phase of life. It makes no attempt to handle extraordinary situations, but to tell a simple, straightforward story in as realistic a manner as possible. The characters are common every-day people and not those of a special class. The metrical tale is to poetry what the short-story is to prose. Many of the modern or imitation ballads may really be classified as metrical tales. The only reason for placing them with the ballads is because of the swing, spirit, and rapidity of the story.

Chaucer. The first great writer of the metrical tale in England, as regards both order of time and rank, was Chaucer.

Note. Since the metrical tale is to be emphasized here as a literary type, it seems wise to omit the thorough study of the Prologue to the "Canterbury Tales," inasmuch as it forms only the introduction, and is not a tale in itself. A brief account of the "Canterbury Tales" as a whole is given here, however, so that the student. may get an idea of the general plan and spirit of the work. If it is desired, of course, the Prologue may be taken up at this point, using one of the texts found in any of the regular series of classics.

The Canterbury Tales.-Chaucer's masterpiece, "The Canterbury Tales," is a large collection of otherwise isolated stories, which are welded into one unified work by means of the prologue and the interludes, or links between the tales. In this Prologue the author introduces twenty-nine pilgrims who are going on a pilgrimage to the shrine of the martyred Archbishop, Thomas à Becket, at Canterbury. They meet by chance at the Tabard Inn in Southwark, and, as they discover that they are all bound on the same errand, they decide to travel together. Chaucer represents himself as one of the number, and takes occasion to give us vivid pictures of the other members of the party before they set out upon

[graphic][merged small][merged small]
« ZurückWeiter »