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"Well, Mrs. Lane," said he, "I suppose by this Christmas you've gotten over being afraid of that fellow McRoy, have n't you? Madison and I have talked about it, you know."

"Very nearly," said Rosita, smiling, "but I am still nervous sometimes. I shall never forget that awful time when he came so near to killing us." "He's the most cold-hearted villain in the world," said Berkly. "The citizens all along the border ought to turn out and hunt him down like a wolf."

"He has committed awful crimes," said Rosita, "but-I-don't-know. I think there is a spot of good somewhere in everybody. He was not always bad-that I know."

Rosita turned into the hallway between the rooms. Santa Claus, in muffling whiskers and furs, was just coming through.

"I heard what you said through the window, Mrs. Lane," he said. "I was just going down in my pocket for a Christmas present for your husband. But I've left one for you instead. It's in the room to your right."

"Oh, thank you, kind Santa Claus," said Rosita, brightly.

Rosita went into the room, while Santa Claus stepped into the cooler air of the yard.

She found no one in the room but Madison.

"Where is my present that Santa said he left for me in here?" she asked.

"Haven't seen anything in the way of a present," said her husband, laughing, "unless he could have meant me."

The next day Gabriel Radd, the foreman of the X. O. Ranch, dropped into the post office at Loma Alta.

"Well, the Frio Kid's got his dose of lead at last," he remarked to the postmaster.

"That so? How 'd it happen?"

"One of old Sanchez's Mexican sheep herders did it!-think of it! the Frio Kid killed by a sheep herder! The Greaser saw him riding along past his camp about twelve o'clock last night, and was so skeered that he up with a Winchester and let him have it. Funniest part of it was that the Kid was dressed all up with white Angora-skin whiskers and a regular Santy Claus rig-out from head to foot. Think of the Frio Kid playing Santy!"

"A CHAPARRAL CHRISTMAS GIFT”

The scene of this story is laid in southern Arizona near the border. Notice the use of surprise. This is characteristic in O. Henry's work.

SOME SHORT-STORIES FOR OPTIONAL READING

Read as many of these short-stories as you have time for, using the following suggestions in writing your reports:

Give author and author's nationality. Which predominates in the story -setting, characters, or plot? Comment on the time, place, and movement of events. Do you find any characters that are not absolutely necessary? Does the story produce a single effect? How has the author handled his opening paragraph? The close of the story? What, in a sentence or two, is the main point of the story? Point out any instances of humor or pathos. Was the story interesting? Did the interest he in the subject matter, or the way the story was told, or in both? Does this story in general conform, or not, to the usual characteristics of a shortstory? How?

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....

Poe

Poe

.Poe

"The Bottle Imp"

"The House with the Green Blinds”.

"The Adventure of the Hansom Cab"

Poe

.Poe

Poe

.Poe

Hawthorne

.Hawthorne

.Hawthorne

Hawthorne

Hawthorne

Hawthorne

Hawthorne

Kipling

.Kipling

.Kipling

..Kipling

"They"

"The Man Who Was"

"The Pavilion on the Links"

"The Merry Men"

"The Story of the Young Man with the Cream

Tarts"

.Kipling

.Kipling

Kipling

.Kipling

..Kipling

Stevenson

Stevenson

Stevenson

Stevenson

Stevenson

Stevenson

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"Heman's Ma"

"Farmer Eli's Vacation".

Any story in the collection "Arizona Nights".
Any story in the collection "Wessex Tales".

"A Passion in the Desert".

"Miss Hinch"...

Stevenson
Bret Harte

.Bret Harte

Bret Harte

.O. Henry
O. Henry

O. Henry

.O. Henry

.O. Henry

O. Henry

De Maupassant

De Maupassant

De Maupassant

De Maupassant
Coppée

Coppée

.Bunner

Bunner

.Bunner

. Bunner
Mark Twain
.Mark Twain
T. J. Stimson

.T. B. Aldrich
.T. B. Aldrich
Stockton

. Hale

.M. E. Wilkins-Freeman
.M. E. Wilkins-Freeman
.M. E. Wilkins-Freeman
.M. E. Wilkins-Freeman
.F. Hopkinson Smith
"Octave Thanet"

. Alice Brown
Alice Brown
.Alice Brown
. Alice Brown

Stewart Edward White .Thomas Hardy

.Balzac

Henry Sydnor Harrison

Any story from any of the various collections published for school use.

REVIEW

1. Before going on to the next type, review what you have learned about the different kinds of prose fiction. How are they distinguished? Why are they all classed as fiction? Which of these kinds did you enjoy most? Why? What writers have done the best work in each type? 2. For your theme work try one of the foilowing subjects:

(1) Write a new Arthur story, creating a new knight of the Round Table and giving his adventures.

(2) Write a prose romance, using the old setting but treating some modern theme allegorically. For instance, draw material from the World War, letting the lady to be rescued be Civilization, or Liberty, or Belgium.

(3) Write a short-story, trying to make it conform as far as possible to the characteristics of the type. Confine yourself to one event, one place, and one time.

CHAPTER III

THE ORATION

Changing Ideals Regarding Public Speaking.--Oratory in the old sense, an elaborate appeal to the emotions spoken in public assemblies, is dying out. Public speaking of a simpler kind, appealing to the will through the intellect, is, however, a form in constant use. Instead of the few gifted orators of the past, we have come to a time when the multifarious demands of our complex life have made good public speakers of the many.

Characteristics of Modern Oratory.-Modern speeches are much more direct and to the point than those of the past. An effective speech is always simple in structure, earnest and sincere in spirit, true in its statements, progressive, even rapid, in its course, forceful and keenly alive to the significance of the occasion which calls. it out; it shows a thorough understanding of the questions involved, and it usually makes no attempt to appeal directly to the emotions.

Occasions for Speeches.-The speech must be adapted to the audience and the occasion. It may be made for the purpose of giving information, of defending a cause, of persuading to a course of action, of eulogizing some person or thing, of commemorating, of welcoming, of bidding farewell, or of dedicating to a particular service, and it may be of a political, social, educational, or religious nature.

Speeches may usually be divided into the following classes, according to their underlying purposes: (1) those for special occasions, being very varied in nature; (2) political speeches; (3) popular lectures and addresses; and (4) sermons.

A good speech has an orderly plan which is easy to follow. It usually divides naturally into three parts-the introduction, the main discussion, and the conclusion. In the introduction the speaker tries to win the attention and interest of his hearers. He simply and briefly states his standpoint and gives any information necessary to the understanding of the question under discussion. Sometimes a more abrupt beginning is good, but in any case the introduction must bear a close relation to what follows. In the

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