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"The Burial of Sir John Moore"...
"Elegy on Thurza”.
"Crossing the Bar".
"Prospice"

"On Cowper's Grave".....

"On the Death of Joseph Rodman Drake".

"Resignation"

"Footsteps of Angels".

"Thanatopsis"

"The Death of the Flowers" "Under the Violets".

"Annabel Lee"...

"Requiem"

"Bereaved"

"On a Soldier Fallen in the Philippines".

"Tennyson"

"For the Fallen".

"The Island of Skyros".

"Requiescant"

"On an American Soldier Fallen in France".

"The Vale of Shadows".

"Kitchener"

.Charles Wolfe
.Byron

.Tennyson
.Browning

.Mrs. Browning

"The Fallen Subaltern".
"How Sleep the Brave".
"The City".
"To Our Fallen".
"Rupert Brooke".

Fitz-Greene Halleck

.Longfellow

.Longfellow

"To One in Paradise".

"O Captain, My Captain".
"When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd"....Whitman
"The Grandsire".....

"In Memoriam F. A. S.".

.Bryant

..Bryant

.Holmes

.Poe

.Poe

Whitman

.Field

.Stevenson
.Stevenson

James Whitcomb Riley
William Vaughn Moody
.Henry Van Dyke
Laurence Binyon
John Masefield
.Frederick George Scott
Clinton Scollard
Clinton Scollard

.John Helston
..Robert Bridges

"Lord Kitchener".

"Uriel" (In memory of William Vaughn Moody). Percy MacKaye "Kitchener of Khartoum".

Robert Stead

.Lieut. Herbert Asquith

Walter de la Mare

Richard Burton
Robert E. Vernede
W. W. Gibson

CHAPTER IV

THE SONG: SACRED AND SECULAR

The song is a short lyric poem which differs from the other forms in that it is intended, primarily, to be sung. It has that particular melodious quality required by the singing voice. Songs are either sacred or secular. The sacred songs include hymns, anthems, and oratorios. The secular songs may have any theme or emotion. Burns is called the greatest song-writer of the world because of the number, variety, and quality of his songs. Some of the finest songs that we have are strewn through Shakespeare's plays. Thomas Moore, Tennyson, Longfellow, and Eugene Field are also noted song-writers. Although our song-writers are not, as a general thing, poets, yet many of our poets have written songs.1 The best songs were composed to music instead of adapted to it.

SOME SONGS FROM SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS

From A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM (Puck's Song)

Over hill, over dale,

Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,

Thorough flood, thorough fire,
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moonës sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green.
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;

In their gold coats spots you see:
Those be rubies, fairy favours,

In those freckles live their savours.
I must go seek some dewdrop here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

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1 Since there are few school buildings now that do not include at least one phonograph in their equipment, it is suggested that a musical program be given in place of the regular English lesson. Songs should be felt, not studied.

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And birds sit brooding in the snow,

And Marian's nose looks red and raw,
When roasted crabs hiss in the bowl,
Then nightly sings the staring owl,
Tu-whit! tu-who! a merry note,
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.

From As YOU LIKE IT

Blow, blow, thou winter wind!
Thou art not so unkind
As man's ingratitude;
Thy tooth is not so keen,
Because thou art not seen,
Although thy breath be rude.

Heigh ho! sing, heigh ho! unto the green holly:
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:

Then, heigh ho, the holly!
This life is most jolly.

Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky!
That dost not bite so nigh
As benefits forgot;
Though thou the waters warp,
Thy sting is not so sharp

As friend remembered not.

Heigh ho! sing, heigh ho! unto the green holly:
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:
Then, heigh ho, the holly!
This life is most jolly.

From As YOU LIKE IT

Under the greenwood tree
Who loves to lie with me,
And tune his merry note
Unto the sweet bird's throat,

Come hither! come hither! come hither!

Here shall he see

No enemy

But winter and rough weather.

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