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FOR

YOUTH, MANHOOD, AND OLD AGE.

INCLUDING

Maxims, Moral and Facetious;

FOR THE

PREVENTION OF DISEASE,

AND THE ATTAINMENT OF

A Long and Higorous Life.

BY AN OLD PHYSICIAN.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY

EFFINGHAM WILSON, ROYAL EXCHANGE.

MDCCCXXX.

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PREFATORY REMARKS.

“ HEALTH WITHOUT Physic!-HEALTH WITHOUT Physic!-the man's surely mad! who can be well without doctor's stuff? impossible ! 'Tis some quack or other puffing off his nostrums." This is the language, or something like it, which it is expected will be growled out and mumbled over, by the sceptical and never to be satisfied many, when they first fix their eyes on the title of this little book. True! we are puffing off a nostrum—such a nostrum, forsooth, as is in every man's power to purchase without putting his hand in his pocket. But where is it? it may be as peevishly asked: the answer is, briefly, read my book, that is to say, this book, and you will find it. Follow the dictates of reason, and Nature, that nevererring guide. “ Throw physic to the dogs," unless you be actually ill ; benefit by the experience of others, and learn to live and supply ature's wants without pampering the appetite to the injury of the constitution. To live long, people must live well, that is, not upon the fat of the land, but rather upon the wholesome products, animal and vegetable, which the land affords, properly prepared and cooked. Temperance, the mother of virtues, and so essential to happiness, among the panacea to which we allude, ought to be cherished, not only for the sake of the good it does the mind, but it should equally be practised with care for the advantages which it procures to the body; it being that alone which preserves the latter in health, and cures it of the diseases with which its oppositeintemperance-afflicts it.

Now, gentle readers, as temperance, the inseparable companion of well-regulated minds, is the nostrum which stands least in need of the puff direct, or oblique, because it is a genuine article, it need only be asked, that, if we do not observe it, with whom ought we to be angry? How can we be happy, if we suffer acute pains—if we are tormented with the gout, or the asthma; if our stomach cease to perform its offices; if our legs, swelled and weak, refuse to support or carry us along? And yet all these, and many other evils, are the certain consequences of intemper

He who purchases the pleasures of the bottle, at the expence of the most acute pains, pays very dear for his wine. If we reason consequentially, the more we love pleasure the fonder we should be of temperance, because it is the latter which makes the former desirable. Temperance, in fine, is so far from being an enemy to pleasures, that it preserves them, and only checks the excessive use of them, which most evidently is the very thing that destroys them.

ance.

There are other considerations under which temperance falls, besides the mere animal propensity of eating and drinking. Intemperance is excess of any kind, and may be applied to 'every function and action of both body and mind; for the due regulation of which, without the aid “ of bolus or pill,” it is the object of the following pages to prescribe; and which, if the prescription be well followed up, it will soon enable a man to “ live all the days of his life,” with satisfaction to himself, and comfort to every one around him.

Is it not then true, my worthy friends and readers, that temperance requires no physician's aid, consequently, neither draught, mixture, electuary, nor powder ? It is itself the true balm of Gilead-it ministers to itself, it is its own doctor, and its own reward: it asks nothing for advice, and always affords real pleasure and lasting happiness to its votaries.

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