The Adventures of a Shakespeare Scholar: To Discover Shakespeare's Art, Band 10

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University of Delaware Press, 1997 - 365 Seiten
Rarely does a scholar single-handedly point Shakespeare study in a new direction. But in the 1950s, when brilliant insights were being achieved in Shakespeare's language, and a few theatre historians were recording stagings and stage business, Marvin Rosenberg led the way to a wider perspective of the poet-playwright's genius. He insisted that Shakespeare's art fused poetry-of-the-word with poetry-of-the-theatre, each illuminating the other inseparably.

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Seite 108 - O, reason not the need ! our basest beggars Are in the poorest thing superfluous : Allow not nature more than nature needs, Man's life is cheap, as beast's : thou art a lady ; If only to go warm were gorgeous, Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear'st, Which scarcely keeps thee warm.
Seite 106 - Hear, nature, hear ; dear goddess, hear ! — Suspend thy purpose, if thou didst intend To make this creature fruitful ! Into her womb convey sterility ! Dry up in her the organs of increase ; And from her derogate body never spring A babe to honour her ! If she must teem, Create her child of spleen ; that it may live, And be a thwart disnatured torment to her...
Seite 110 - Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads, and unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these...
Seite 125 - Which would be worn now in their newest gloss, Not cast aside so soon. Lady M. Was the hope drunk Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since, And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely ? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou...
Seite 98 - From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty ; As surfeit is the father of much fast, So every scope by the immoderate use Turns to restraint; our natures do pursue (Like rats that ravin down their proper bane,) A thirsty evil ; and when we drinK, we die.
Seite 290 - I have heard That guilty creatures, sitting at a play, Have by the very cunning of the scene Been struck so to the soul that presently They have proclaim'd their malefactions; For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak With most miraculous organ.
Seite 209 - Sir, I love you more than words can wield the matter; Dearer than eyesight, space, and liberty; Beyond what can be valued, rich or rare...

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