Social Contract

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Simon and Schuster, 15.06.2010 - 128 Seiten
10 Rezensionen
In Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Discourses on the Origin of Inequality, he outlines his own history of the development of human society. He explains in general terms how the differences between social and economic classes arose alongside the formation of modern states. He also explores the means by which these inequalities were actually built into and perpetuated by the foundational notions of modern society and government.

Rather than endorse a return to the peaceful ways of pre-modern human beings, Rousseau addresses these inequalities in his seminal work, The Social Contract. Rousseau does not see government as an inherently corrupting influence, and he makes very clear and precise recommendations about how the state can and should protect the equality and character of its citizens.
 

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It should come as no surprise that reading piecemeal translations of classic works is no substitute for reading the work cover to cover. I was surprised to find that the words used to justify the ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

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Nutzerbericht  - greeniezona - LibraryThing

I continue to love the Penguin Great Ideas series. Though the simple inclusion of a date of original publication would be very nice. Anyway, the book is a discussion of governments. Ideal governments ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

BOOK II
23
CHAPTER PAGE III WHETHER THE GENERAL WILL CAN ERR
26
OF THE LIMITS OF THE SOVEREIGN POWER
27
OF THE RIGHT OF LIFE AND DEATH
31
OF THE LAW
32
OF THE LEGISLATOR
35
OF THE PEOPLE
39
OF THE PEOPLE Continued
41
OF DEMOCRACY
59
OF ARISTOCRACY
61
OF MONARCHY
63
OF MIXED GOVERNMENTS
68
THAT EVERY FORM OF GOVERNMENT WOULD NOT BE PROPER IN EVERY COUNTRY
69
OF THE SIGNS OF A GOOD GOVERNMENT
74
OF THE ABUSE OF GOVERNMENT AND ITS PROPENSITY TO DEGENERATE
76
OF THE DEATH OF THE BODY POLITIC
79

OF THE PEOPLE Continued
43
OF THE DIFFERENT SYSTEMS OF LEGISLATION
46
OF THE DIVISION OF THE LAWS
48
BOOK III
50
OF THE PRINCIPLES WHICH CONSTITUTE THE DIF FERENT FORMS OF GOVERNMENT
55
OF THE DIVISION OF GOVERNMENTS
57
XII How THE SOVEREIGN AUTHORITY IS MAINTAINED
80
THAT THE INSTITUTION OF GOVERNMENT IS NOT
87
OF SUFFRAGE
94
OF THE CENSORSHIP
113
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
126
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2010)

Jean Jacques Rousseau was a Swiss philosopher and political theorist who lived much of his life in France. Many reference books describe him as French, but he generally added "Citizen of Geneva" whenever he signed his name. He presented his theory of education in Emile (1762), a novel, the first book to link the educational process to a scientific understanding of children; Rousseau is thus regarded as the precursor, if not the founder, of child psychology. "The greatest good is not authority, but liberty," he wrote, and in The Social Contract (1762) Rousseau moved from a study of the individual to an analysis of the relationship of the individual to the state: "The art of politics consists of making each citizen extremely dependent upon the polis in order to free him from dependence upon other citizens." This doctrine of sovereignty, the absolute supremacy of the state over its members, has led many to accuse Rousseau of opening the doors to despotism, collectivism, and totalitarianism. Others say that this is the opposite of Rousseau's intent, that the surrender of rights is only apparent, and that in the end individuals retain the rights that they appear to have given up. In effect, these Rousseau supporters say, the social contract is designed to secure or to restore to individuals in the state of civilization the equivalent of the rights they enjoyed in the state of nature. Rousseau was a passionate man who lived in passionate times, and he still stirs passion in those who write about him today.

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