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THE

OFFICER'S GUIDE

AND

FARMER'S MANUAL,

CONTAINING

A COMPREHENSIVE COLLECTION OF JUDICIAL AND BUSINESS FORMS
ADAPTED TO THE JURISPRUDENCE OF INDIANA, WITH AN
EXPLANATION OF LAW PHRASES AND TECHNI-

CAL TERMS BOTH LATIN AND FRENCH;

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED

THE

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE,

THE

CONSTITUTION OF THE U. STATES,

AND THE

CONSTITUTION OF INDIANA.

BY JOHN CAIN, ESQ.

INDIANAPOLIS:

PRINTED BY DOUGLASS AND MAGUIRE

HARVARD
UNIVERSITY
LIBRARY
45* 3101

United States of America, Is

INDIANA DISTRICT,

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twenty-fifth day of Au. gust in the year of our Lord eighieen hundred and thirty-two, and of the independence of the United States the fifty-seventh, John Cain of the said District has deposited in this office the title of a book the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

“The Officer's Guide and Farmer's Manual, containing a comprehensive collection of Judicial and Business Forms, adapted to the Jurisprudence of Indiana, with an explanation of Law Phrases and Techpical Terms, both Latin and French; to which is prefixed, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, and the Constitution of Indiana, by John Cain, Esq."

In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States, entitled "An act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the time therein mentioned," and also the act entitled

An act supplementary to the act entitled an act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the time therein mentioned,” and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etcbing bistorical and other prints.

H. HURST, Clerk

the Indiana District.

PREFACE.

WHEN an author presents a new work to the world, it is ex* pected that he will assign some reason for its publication. Something is looked for, either entirely new, or so improved as to just tify the purchaser in parting with his money to procure it. It is not alleged, in the present instance, that the book now presented to the world has the charm of novelty, or that any new light is thereby shed on the science of jurisprudence; it is offered only as a way-mark to guide the traveller, in the long frequented path of business or official duty. Its utility is its principal recominendation. Although the purchaser of this book may find in it nothing to gratify his taste for amusement, to tickle his fancy, or enlarge his stock of scientific knowledge; yet if it proves to be a useful assistant in the ordinary transactions of business, or in the discharge of official duty, he will not regret the small expense incurred in procuring it."

The obvious necessity for a book of forms, adapted to the business, the customs, and jurisprudence of Indiana, and the frequent and earnest inquiries for books of that description, induced the publisher of this work to undertake to furnish one more congenial to the laws and business of this state than any heretofore published. When he first announced his intention to publish this book, he admitted his want of qualification to compile a work of the kind proposed. He accordingly procured, for its compilation, the labours of a gentleman of skill and experience in the profession of the law. For the correctness of the compilation, therefore, he acknowledges no other responsibility than what arises from his selection of a suitable hand to superintend that department; yet of that part he will say, that to expect a work of this kind, entirely clear of defects, would be to look for what humaa skill never has, and never can produce. It is admitted, that notwithstanding the time and care which have been used to obtain perfect accuracy, some errors and imperfections may be found to exist; such imperfections, however, should any be found, are to be imputed rather to the nature of the undertaking than to any negligence or want of skill in the compiler. The publisher, while he confesses he feels some solicitude for the credit and success of his book, cheerfully gives it to the world, with its excellencies, and defects. As it was not his object, in undertaking this publication,

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