Analysis of the English Language: Part I. Grammar. Part II. Etymological Derivations. Part III. Praxis. Containing a Systematic Course of Examination-questions; All the Questions on Grammar and Etymology Proposed at the Woolwich Competitive Examinations from 1854 to 1869; the Papers Set at the Oxford and Cambridge Local Examinations for Several Years. Reprinted from the Latest English Ed., with Corr., Additions, and Copious Indices

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Courier Company, 1875 - 350 Seiten

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Seite 273 - To kings, that fear their subjects' treachery ? O, yes it doth ; a thousand-fold it doth. And to conclude, — the shepherd's homely curds, His cold thin drink out of his leather bottle, His wonted sleep under a fresh tree's shade, All which secure and sweetly he enjoys, Is far beyond a prince's delicates, His viands sparkling in a golden cup, • His body couched in a curious bed, When care, mistrust, and treason wait on him.
Seite 290 - The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel, But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch'd, unfledged comrade.
Seite 290 - He, that has light within his own clear breast, May sit in the centre, and enjoy bright day: But he, that hides a dark soul and foul thoughts, Benighted walks under the mid-day sun; Himself is his own dungeon.
Seite 325 - Dangerous it were for the feeble brain of man to wade far into the doings of the Most High; whom although to know be life, and joy to make mention of his name, yet our soundest knowledge is to know that we know him not as indeed he is, neither can know him; and our safest eloquence concerning him is our silence, when we confess without confession that his glory is inexplicable, his greatness above our capacity and reach. He is above, and we upon earth; therefore it behoveth our words to be wary and...
Seite 254 - CAPTAIN or Colonel, or Knight in arms, Whose chance on these defenceless doors may seize, If deed of honour did thee ever please, Guard them, and him within protect from harms. He can requite thee, for he knows the charms...
Seite 273 - Ah, what a life were this! how sweet! how lovely! Gives not the hawthorn bush a sweeter shade To shepherds, looking on their silly sheep, Than doth a rich embroider'd canopy To kings that fear their subjects
Seite 314 - More things are wrought by prayer Than this world dreams of. Wherefore, let thy voice Rise like a fountain for me night and day. For what are men better than sheep or goats That nourish a blind life within the brain, If, knowing God, they lift not hands of prayer Both for themselves and those who call them friend? For so the whole round earth is every way Bound by gold chains about the feet of God.
Seite 245 - ... as unknown, and yet well known; as dying, and behold, we live; as chastened, and not killed; as sorrowful, yet always rejoicing; as poor, yet making many rich; as having nothing, and yet possessing all things.
Seite 280 - A man he was to all the country dear. And passing rich with forty pounds a year. Remote from towns he ran his godly race, Nor e'er had changed, nor wished to change his place.
Seite 278 - Tis brightness all ; save where the new snow melts Along the mazy current. Low the woods Bow their hoar head ; and ere the languid sun, Faint from the west, emits his evening ray, Earth's universal face, deep hid and chill, Is one wild dazzling waste, that buries wide The works of man.

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