Stratagems of Chess: Or, a Collection of Critical and Remarkable Situations, Selected from the Works of Eminent Masters

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T. and J. Allman, 1817 - 2 Seiten
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Seite 16 - ... strongest, and your enemy weakest. By this it is probable you will be able to break through your adversary's game, in which some pieces must be exchanged. Now pause again and survey both games attentively, and do not let your impetuosity hurry you...
Seite 5 - MOVE your pawns before your pieces, and afterwards bring out the pieces to support them ; therefore the king's, queen's, and bishop's pawns should be the first played, in order to open the game well. 2. Do not, therefore, play out any of your pieces early in the game, because you thereby lose moves, in case your adversary can, by playing a pawn, make them retire, and also opens his game at the same time; especially avoid playing your queen out, till your game is tolerably well opened.
Seite 8 - Let not your adversary's knight (particularly if duly guarded) come to check your king and queen, or your king and rook, or your queen and rook, or your two rooks at the same time : for in the...
Seite 3 - ... and loses the game. The king cannot change his square, if he by so doing goes into check; and when he has no man to play, and is not in check, yet is so blocked up, that he cannot move without going into check, this position is called a stale-mate, and in this case the king, who is stale-mated, wins the game.
Seite 7 - Play your men in guard of one another, so that if any be taken, the enemy may also be captured by that which guarded yours, and endeavour to have as many guards to your piece as your adversary advances others upon it ; and if possible, let them be -of less value than those he assails with. When you cannot well support your piece, see if by attacking one of his that is better, or as good, you may not thereby save yours. 9. Never attack but when well prepared, for thereby you open your adversary's...
Seite 16 - ... of use to each other. For want of this method, and a little coolness, an almost sure victory is often snatched out of a player's hands, and a total overthrow ensues. 3. At the last period of the game, observe where your pawns are strongest, best connected, and nearest to queen ; likewise mind how your adversary's pawns are disposed, and compare these things together ; and, if you can get to queen before him, proceed without hesitation ; if not, hurry on with your king to prevent him : I speak...
Seite 11 - ... until the end of the game ; and it is generally better to have a worse piece in play than a superior out. 28. When you have moved a piece, which your adversary drives away with a pawn, that is a bad move, your enemy gaining a double advantage. At this nice game no move can be indifferent. Though the first move may not be much, between equally good players, yet the loss of one or two more, after the...
Seite 9 - ... should not stir them till forced to it. 17. Endeavour to have a move in ambuscade ; that is, place the queen, bishop, or rook behind a pawn, or a piece, in such a manner, as...
Seite 10 - ... 21. At the latter end of a game, each party having only three or four pawns on different sides of the board, the kings are to endeavour to gain the move, in order to win the game.
Seite 18 - Whenever you can make an opening with two orthree pawns on the adversary's king, you then are almost sure of the game. 11. If ever the strength of your game consists of pawns, strive to take the adversary's bishops, because they, much more than the rooks, could prevent the advancement of your pawns.

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