Europe, Or, A General Survey of the Present Situation of the Principal Powers: With Conjectures on Their Future Prospects

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O. Everett, 1822 - 451 Seiten
 

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Seite 411 - If war should arise between the two contracting parties, the merchants of either country then residing in the other shall be allowed to remain nine months to collect their debts and settle their affairs, and may depart freely, carrying off all their effects without molestation or hindrance; and all women and children scholars of every faculty, cultivators of the earth, artisans, manufacturers, and fishermen, unarmed and inhabiting unfortified towns, villages, or places, and in general all others...
Seite 411 - ... in their persons, nor shall their houses or goods be burnt or otherwise destroyed, nor their fields wasted by the armed force of the enemy...
Seite 316 - The mysterious monument of Stonehenge, standing remote and alone upon a bare and boundless heath, as much unconnected with the events of past ages, as it is with the uses of the present, carries you back beyond all historical records into the obscurity of a wholly unknown period.
Seite 304 - ... of algebra. This profuse and interminable flow of words is not in itself either a rare or remarkable endowment. It is wholly a thing of habit, and is exercised by every village lawyer with various degrees of power and grace.
Seite 411 - ... all women and children, scholars of every faculty, cultivators of the earth, artisans, manufacturers, and fishermen unarmed and inhabiting unfortified towns, villages, or places, and in general all others whose occupations are for the common subsistence and benefit of mankind, shall be allowed to continue their respective employments, and shall not' be molested in their persons, nor shall their houses...
Seite 300 - ... character as well as intellect. To think is the highest exercise of the mind ; to say what you think, the boldest effort of moral courage ; and both these things are required for a really powerful writer. Eloquence without thoughts is a mere parade of words; and no man can express with spirit and vigour any thoughts but his own. This was the secret of the eloquence of Rousseau, which is not without a certain analogy in its forms to that of Burk«. The principal of the Jesuits...
Seite 298 - I see but little ground for this assertion, if literary excellence is here understood in any other sense, than as an immediate result of the highest intellectual and moral endowments. Such compositions, as the writings of Burke, suppose, no doubt, the fine taste, the command of language, and the finished education, which are all supposed by every description of literary success. But in the present state of society these qualities are far from being uncommon ; and are possessed by thousands, who make...
Seite 316 - ... the Druids raised it ; but by what machinery could these half barbarians have wrought and moved such immense masses of rock ? By what fatality is it, that in every part of the globe the most durable impressions, that have been made upon its surface, were the work of races now entirely extinct? Who were the builders of the pyramids and the massy monuments of Egypt and India ? Who constructed the Cyclopean walls of Italy and Greece, or elevated the innumerable and inexplicable mounds, which are...
Seite 315 - ... residence. The aspect of the cities is as various, as that of the country. Oxford, in the silent, solemn grandeur of its numerous collegiate palaces, with their massy stone walls and vast interior quadrangles, seems like the deserted capital of some departed race of giants. This is the splendid sepulchre, where science, like the Roman Tarpeia, lies buried under the weight of gold, that rewarded her ancient services, and where copious libations of the richest port and madeira are daily poured...
Seite 412 - ... exchanging the products of different places, and thereby rendering the necessaries, conveniences, and comforts of human life more easy to be obtained, and more general, shall be allowed to pass free and unmolested ; and neither of the contracting powers shall grant or issue any commission to any private armed vessels, empowering them to take or destroy such trading vessels or interrupt such commerce.

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