Second series. 1860-1888

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Inhalt

IRISH ART AND CHARACTER
30
SAXON ART AND CHARACTER
32
PAGE
34
NORMAN ART AND CHARACTER
35
CAMPOSANTO OF PISA
38
TOMB OF GALILEO GALILEI IN STA 4
41
ValdArnoV dL 1874
44
SYMBOLIC ORNAMENT
46
PERFECT ILLUMINATION
48
NEITH AND ST BARBARA
49
ARCHITECTURES AND RELIGIONS
53
GIOTTOS FRESCOES AT STA CROCK
62
LIPPI AND BOTTICELLI
65
SUPERSTITION AND RELIGION IN ART
67
INSPIRATION IN ART
71
JOHN BELLINI
75
colourists and ciiiaroscurists
76
hoi beins dance of death 8l 3a A madonna by durer S3
83
31 THE ART OF ENGRAVING
85
3 EXECUTION IN PAINTING
87
33 CRAFTSMANSHIP
89
34 ALL GREAT ART IS PRAISE
91
35 THE THEORY OF RESEMBLANCE
94
3 A CAUTION TO REALISTS
98
37 THE NECESSITY OF INVENTION IN ART
99
ART AND ANATOMY
101
OBSERVATION AND INFORMATION
105
4a ROSSETTI AND HOLMAN HUNT
107
E BURNEJONES
110
ENGLISH LANDSCAPE
114
THE LOVE OF LANDSCAPE
120
CONDITIONS OF LANDSCAPE ART
121
POIULAR ART
123
LF NVOY
124
EDUCATION 47 THE STRAIT GATE OF ART
127
TASTE AND CHARACTER
128
ART THE TEST OF MORALS
131
MUSIC AND POETRY INTERDEPENDENT
132
ASHESTIEL AND ABnOTSFORI
136
BYRON
141
DR JOHNSON
144
BOOKS
145
THE ARISTOCRACY OF INTELLECT
148
SCHOLARSHIP 50
150
WORK OF IMAGINATION IN LITERATURE
151
THE CLASSICS AS TEACHERS
157
6a FICTION
161
FAIRY TALES
163
STUDY
166
THE LOCOMOTIVE
169
EYES AND MICROSCOPES
171
MORE HASTE LESS SPEED
172
PACE
175
OLDFASHIONED TRAVELLING
176
THE OLD JURA ROAD I So 68 EDUCATION IN TRAVEL
183
THE SLOTH AND THE SQUIRREL
184
EDUCATIONAL AIMS
186
EDUCATIONAL STIMULUS
194
EDUCATION AND CRIME
198
THE USE OF MUSEUMS
200
HANDICRAFT TRAINING
201
ABOUT GARDENING
202
INFANCY
204
THE IMAGINATION IN CHILDHOOD
205
THE EDUCATION OF GIRLS
206
CONTENTMENT
209
EDUCATION DESTROYS EQUALITY
211
THE END OF EDUCATION
212
ETHICS 83 MAN AND BEAST
214
MAN IN CREATION
215
EYESIGHT
218
OPINION
221
conscience
223
the moral sanction
224
the basis of morality
228
imagination as a moral factor 231
231
PASSION
232
LIBERTY
254
CARSHALTON POOi
259
SLAVERY
261
CHIVALRIC OBEDIENCE
262
MAN AND WOMAN
263
coURTSHIP
266
BEAUTY
267
no DRESS
272
womans WORK
273
WOMANS MISSION
275
3 THE DISCIPLINE OF WAR
280
CHIVALRIC AND MODERN WARFARE
287
THE BURDF N OF ENGLAND
290
ECONOMY Jl6 THE ART OF GROWING RICH
294
WEALTH
295
COMMERCE
301
MONEY
304
I2a THE GAME OF MONEY MAKING
306
RICH AND POOR 122 THE BUSINESS MAN AS HERO
307
THE BUSINESS MAN AS SAINT
315
ProserpinaPros 18751886
319
USURY 126 THE SINEWS OK
320
THE POWER OF CAPITAL
325
SUPPLY AND DEMANIl 327
327
STEWARDSHIP
328
LUXURY
331
MASTER AND SERVANT
333
HEAD WORK AND HAND WORK
336
THE VALUE OF LABOUR
337
COMPETITION IN THE LABOUR MARKET
339
COOPERATION
340
LAND
342
CAPITALISTS OR CAPTAINS?
343
GOVERNMENT
344
POLITICAL APHORISMS
348
14a ROYALTY
354
ARISTOCRACY
355
COMMONALTY
357
A MODEL COMMONWEALTH
359
THERE IS NO WEALTH BUT LIFE
369
GOVERNMENT BY EXAMPLE
372
A PLEA FOR HAND LABOUR
373
A NEW ARCADY
378
PEACE ON EARTH
381
THE FUTURE OF ENGLAND
384
15a MODERN ITALY
386
THE BELLS OF CLUSF
388
RELIGION 152 THE STAGES OF FAITH
391
CHAOS? OR COSMOS?
394
THE REVELATION OF SPIRIT
395
RELIGION DEFINF I
397
IDOLATRY
398
SERPENT MYTHS
399
THE SPIRIT OF EVIL
402
THREE STAGES OF NATIONAL RELIGION
404
ifo NATIONAL WORSHIP
408
THE GARDEN OF GOD
410
ON THE STUDY OF MYTHOLOGY
412
HEATHEN PIETY
416
THE GODDESS OF ATHENS
419
CHRISTIAN MYTHOLOGY
424
ST MARTIN OF TOURS
432
l6S THE ANCHORITES
438
THE CARTHUSIANS
440
THE BIBLE OF AMIENS
442
THE LORDS SUPPER
447
DIVINE SERVICE
449
SENTIMENTAL RELIGION
450
PRACTICAL RELIGION
452
PRIDE OF FAITH AND PRIDE OF SCIENCE
455
MIRACLES
457
PRAYER
459
THE LORDS PRAYER
460
INSPIRATION
462
So THE MYSTERY OF PAIN
464
l8l THE PLEASURES OF FAITH
466
INDEX
469

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 459 - And Elijah the Tishbite, who was of the inhabitants of Gilead, said unto Ahab, "As the Lord God of Israel liveth, before whom I stand, there shall not be dew nor rain these years, but according to my word.
Seite 148 - ... here, and audience there, when all the while this eternal court is open to you, with its society wide as the world, multitudinous as its days, the chosen, and the mighty, of every place and time...
Seite 150 - ... you might read all the books in the British Museum (if you could live long enough), and remain an utterly
Seite 263 - We are foolish, and without excuse foolish, in speaking of the "superiority" of one sex to the other, as if they could be compared in similar things. Each has what the other has not: each completes the other, and is completed by the other : they are in nothing alike, and the happiness and perfection of both depend on each asking and receiving from the other what the other only can give.
Seite 279 - For a breeze of morning moves, And the planet of Love is on high, Beginning to faint in the light that she loves On a bed of daffodil sky, To faint in the light of the sun she loves, To faint in his light, and to die. All...
Seite 148 - Now books of this kind have been written in all ages by their greatest men :— by great leaders, great statesmen, and great thinkers. These are all at your choice; and life is short. You have heard as much before; — yet have you measured and mapped out this short life and its possibilities ? Do you know, if you read this, that you cannot read that — that...
Seite 369 - THERE is -NO WEALTH BUT LIFE. Life, including all its powers of love, of joy, and of admiration. That country is the richest which nourishes the greatest number of noble and happy human beings; that man is richest who, having perfected the functions of his own life to the utmost, has also the widest helpful influence, both personal, and by means of his possessions, over the lives of others.
Seite 290 - When men are rightly occupied, their amusement grows out of their work, as the colour-petals out of a fruitful flower; — when they are faithfully helpful and compassionate, all their emotions become steady, deep, perpetual, and vivifying to the soul as the natural pulse to the body. But now, having no true business, we pour our...
Seite 9 - So fair, so sweet, withal so sensitive, Would that the little Flowers were born to live, Conscious of half the pleasure which they give ; That to this mountain-daisy's self were known The beauty of its star-shaped shadow, thrown On the smooth surface of this naked stone...
Seite 111 - He hath put down the mighty from their seat : and hath exalted the humble and meek.

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