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5. Every person must influence the happiness of others, by his disponi rion, either to hurt or benefit them. Proper resentment for injustice at #empted, or actually committed, is the only motive that can justify our dis. turbing the happiness of our neighbour.

6. A sacred regard for the happiness of others, so as not to disturb it, even when no law protects them, constitutes the character of a just man.

7. After himself, a man's family are naturally the objects of his warmegi affection. Children have our highest sympathy. Our tenderness for them is more active than our reverence and gratitude for our parents. The weakness of children interests the affections of the most brutal; while the infirmities of old age arc objects of contempt to all but the good.

8. Next to the relations of parents and children, are those of brothers and sisters, and so on through all the relations of consanguinity. Their habitual intercourse produces habitual sympathy, called affection. The good and virtuous regard these ties, and the dissipated and profligate des. pise them.

9. Next to our relatives come those who are recommended by their per sonal qualities. This is founded upon approbation of an individual's conduct, confirmed by long acquaintance, and is called by the venerable and sacred name of friendship.

10. Benefactors, who have rendered us a kindness, have a natural claim upon our gratitude. Those also who are distinguished by their extraordinary situations excite our attention. As the greatly fortunate, and the greatly unfortunate ; the rich and the powerful, and the poor and wretched. The peace and order of society depend on our respect for the former ; the relief of human misery, on our compassion for the latter.

11. The state, or sovereignty, in which we are born and educated, is next recommended to our affection. Not only we ourselves, but all the objects of our love, our children, our parents, our relatives, our friends, our benefactors, are all comprehended in it. Every good citizen loves his country, respects its laws, and wishes to promote, by every means in his power, the welfare of the whole society, in which he lives.

12. A good man loves all mankind, because they all are under the special care of that great, benevolent, and all wise Being, who created, maintains, and directs all things, at all times, for the general good.

13. A fatherless world is the most melancholy of all reflections. The highest splendour cannot enlighten the gloom, which such an idea spreads over the imagination. Nor can the most afflicting adversity disturb the joy of the good man, under the conviction that this world has a wise and benevolent Father for its Protector and Guide.

14. From this view of a Providence, mạn discovers himself to be a moral agent, bound to take care of his own happiness, that of his family, his friends, and his country; making his own interest his motive, and God's will his rule of conduct. This rule is known from God's declarations in the scriptures, or by his works, denominated the law of nature.

15. The method of coming at the will of God, concerning any action, by the light of nature, is to inquire into the tendency of the action to promote or diminish the general happiness. It is evident, that God, when he made man, willed and wished his happiness. Every child at its sport, even the most trivial occurrence, demonstrates the finger of God:

16. Therefore, he who best promotes his own happiness, that of his family, his friends, his country, and of mankind, acts most consistently with the will of God, and thus performs, in the most perfect manner, his moral obligations

FINIS.

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Page.
PREFACE,

3 A persecuting Spirit Reproved, 77
Rules for Reading,
4 Sisterly Unity and Love,

ib
Of Pauses or Points,

5 Ibrahim the Hermit and a Youth, 79
Table of the two Slides,
6 The Poor Old Man,

81
Theory
ib | The Victim,

82
Initial Sounds,

ib Albert and his Daughter,
A Cruel Boy,

17 Filial Sensibility,
The Silly Girl,

18 The Noble Basket Maker,
The Brother and Sister,

ib Logan, a Mingo Chief,
Amelia and her Canary Bird, 19 The Compassionate Judge,
The little Girl and the Lamb, 22 The Generous Negro,

90
The little Boy and his Father, 24 The faithful American Dog, 91
Alexis and Amanda,
25 Disrespect to Parents,

92
The Boy and Swallow's Nest, 27 Noble Behaviour of Scipio, 93
Little Junius and the fruitful Vine, 29 The grateful Scholars,

95
Emily and Edwin,

31 | The Merchant and his Dog, 96
The story of Bertrand, 33 Indian Magnanimity,

97
The Gardener,
36 Virtue in Humble Life,

98
The journey to Market, 37 General Putnam and the Wolf, 100
Young People's wishes exposed, 41 Matilda and her Son,

102
The four little Girls,
42 The aged Prisoner,

104
Old Age made Happy,
45 Androcles and the Lion,

106
We destroy Pleasure by pur-

Pocahontas,

108
suing it too eagerly, 48 | Parental Affection,

110
Disinterested Humanity, 49. The Venetian and Turkey 111
The Farmer and his two Sons, ib A Generous Mind,

118
Erskine and Freeport,

50 Insolent Deportment Reproved, 119
The Young Recruit,
51 Monition to Parents,

120
Lucretia and Virginia,
52 Arachne and Melissa,

121
Negligence,
53 To Parents,

122
The Improvement of Time, ib Youth, the proper season for
Idleness and Irresolution, 54 gaining Knowledge, 123
Obedience to Parents,

55 Execution of Cranmer,
Ingratitude,

ib The Spaniard and Peruvian,
Filial Affection,
ib The Snow Storm.se

134
The Female Choice,
57 | The Widow and her Son, .

143
The Father redeemed from

From a Preceptor to his Pupils, 146
Slavery by his Son, 58 Description of Mount Etna, 149
Incle and Yarico,

60 Eruption of Mount Vesuvius, 151
Demetrius and the Athenians, 62 Niagara River and Falls, 153
Alcander and Septimius, 63 The Bay of Naples,

154
Joseph and his Brethren, 65 Filial Piety,

156
The Pious Sons,
69 Benevolence,

ib
Respect due to Tutors,

ib Speculation and Practice, 157
Ingenuity and industry rewarded, 70 Ingratitude, highly culpable, il
Brethren should dwell together in The Four Seasons,

158
love and harmony, 72 Charity,

159
Omar and Hassan,
74 Health,

160
The Supreme Ruler of the World, 76 Gratitude,
Abraham and Lof,

ib Mortality,

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126

127

Page

3

24-

Page.
Im nortality,

161 | Gratitude to the Supreme Being, 227

Heaven,

162 Friendship,

228

The Folly of Pride,

163 Compassion and Forgiveness, ib

The Swiftness of Time, 165 | Tenderness of Mind, :

229
Slander and Slanderers, 167 | Early Rising,

io

The Ungrateful Guest, :

169 | The Goldfinches,

230

A true Friend,

170 Elegy tn Pity,

231

True Pleasure,

171 | The Sluggard,

232

The Wisdom of Providence, 172 Remember the Poor,

ib

Comforts of Religion,

173 Rural Charms,

233

Filial Piety and Obedience, 174 Unhappy close of Life,

234

Education of Youth,

177 To-morrow,

ib

Learning our own Language, 178 A kind and gentle Temper, 235

Female Education,

180 The Progress of Improvement, in

Monition to Children,

181 Cheerfulness,

236

Parental Example,
133 Mirth,

26

Vision of Mirza,

184 Raillery,

237

The Earl of Strafford,

187 Joy,

ib

Founder of Christianity,

188 Love,

238

The Balance of Happiness, 189 Pity,

Improvement of Time,

191 Hope,

239

T'he Hill of Science,

192 | Hatred,

ib

Fourth of July,

194 Anger,

ib

Monition to America,

195 Revenge,

National Industry,

196 Reproach,

ib

io

Docility the Basis of Education, 198 Fear and Terrour,
Eulogy on Washington, 199 | Sorrow,

241

Death of Washington,

200 | Remorse,

24%

ib

Minot's Oration on Washington, 203 Despair,

Death of Hamilton,

206 Surprise and Astonishment, 243

Pitt's Speech in Parliament, 208 Pride,

ib

Part of Hannibal's Speech, 209 Courage and Boasting, 244

tb

Brutus on the Death of Cæsar, 210 Perplexity,
Part of Cicero's Oration, 211 Vexation,

26
Speech to Alexander,
212 | Peevishness,

245
Publius Scipio's Speech,
913 Malice,

ib
Canute and his Courtiers,
215 Jtalousy, :

ib
The two Robbers,
web Columbia

246

A Family Conversation, 216 Washington and Liberty,

Democritus and Heraclitus, 219 Premonition to Teachers, &c. 248

Dionysius, Pythias, and Damon, 220 Declaration of Independence, 249

Rules for Reading Verse, 992 Articles of Confederation, 250

on Scanning,

223 Constitution of the U. States, 259

Washington's Farewell Address, 271

PIECES IN POETRY

Gen. Washington's Resignation, 289

ib.

The Doves,

224 Answer of Congress,
Heavenly Wisdom,

225 Character of Washington,

zb
A Morning in Spring,

285

Tomb of Washington,
An Evening Hymn,

226 Extract from Washington's
"The Winter's Day,
ib Will,

287
knowledgement of Divine Epitaph on Washington
Cavours.

227 Principles of Law,

283

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