Sharpe's London Magazine, Band 9

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T. B. Sharpe, 1849
 

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Seite 50 - The eclipse of Nature spreads my pall, — The majesty of Darkness shall Receive my parting ghost ! This spirit shall return to Him That gave its heavenly spark ; Yet think not, Sun, it shall be dim When thou thyself art dark ! No ! it shall live again, and shine In bliss unknown to beams of thine, By Him recalled to breath, Who captive led captivity, Who robbed the grave of Victory, And took the sting from Death...
Seite 125 - One more unfortunate, Weary of breath, Rashly importunate, Gone to her death! Take her up tenderly, Lift her with care; Fashion'd so slenderly, Young, and so fair! Look at her garments Clinging like cerements; Whilst the wave constantly Drips from her clothing; Take her up instantly, Loving, not loathing. — Touch her not scornfully; Think of her mournfully, Gently and humanly...
Seite 108 - It hath been formerly judged that the domestic servants of the King of Heaven should be of the noblest families on earth; and, though the iniquity of the late times have made clergymen meanly valued and the sacred name of Priest contemptible, yet I will labour to make it honourable by consecrating all my learning and all my poor abilities to advance the glory of that God that gave them...
Seite 101 - Phoebus replied, and touched my trembling ears: "Fame is no plant that grows on mortal soil, Nor in the glistering foil Set off to the world, nor in broad rumour lies, But lives and spreads aloft by those pure eyes And perfect witness of all-judging Jove; As he pronounces lastly on each deed, Of so much fame in heaven expect thy meed.
Seite 155 - And Jacob said unto his brethren, Gather stones; and they took stones, and made an heap: and they did eat there upon the heap. 47 . And Laban called it Jegarsahadutha: but Jacob called it Galeed. 48. And Laban said, This heap is a witness between me and thee this day.
Seite 182 - As the news spread, streets and squares, marketplaces and coffeehouses, broke forth into acclamations. Yet were the acclamations less strange than the weeping. For the feelings of men had been wound up to such a point, that at length the stern English nature, so little used to outward signs of emotion, gave way, and thousands sobbed aloud for very joy. Meanwhile, from the outskirts of the multitude, horsemen were spurring off to bear along all the great roads intelligence of the victory of our Church...
Seite 43 - Wallah ! your books are right, and the Franks know that which is hid from the true believer. Here is the gold, sure enough, and, please God, we shall find it all in a few days. Only don't say anything about it to those Arabs, for they are asses and cannot hold their tongues. The matter will come to the ears of the Pasha.
Seite 109 - His coach was, with much difficulty, and by the help of many hands, brought after him entire. In general, carriages were taken to pieces at Conway, and borne, on the shoulders of stout Welsh peasants, to the Menai Straits.
Seite 43 - Bey," exclaimed one of them — " hasten to the diggers, for they have found Nimrod himself. Wallah, it is wonderful, but it is true ! we have seen him with our eyes. There is no God but God ;" and both joining in this pious exclamation, they galloped off, without further words, in the direction of their tents.
Seite 109 - It was only in fine weather that the whole breadth of the road was available for wheeled vehicles. Often the mud lay deep on the right and the left ; and only a narrow track of firm ground rose above the quagmire.

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