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They are not, in general, to be separated from the rela-
tive, or the noun,

173, 274
They govern the objective case,

172
Different relations require different prepositions, though
connected by the same verb,

173
A copious list of errors in applying the different prepo-
sitions,

173-175
What prepositions are proper before nouns of place, 176
When the preposition is to be omitted,

191
How to be pointed,

238
PRONOUN. Its general nature and use,

55
Three kinds of pronouns,

55
Three persons to each number of the pronoun,

-55
Why the third person only is marked by gender,

66
The Personal pronouns how declined,

66
The Relative pronoun and its varieties explained, 57-59
The Relative and Interrogative not distinct species, 59
The Adjective pronoun and its four subdivisions ex
plained,

59-62
Various opinions, respecting the Adjective pronoun,
stated,

62, 63
Pronouns agree with their antecedents, in gender and
number,

135
Relatives, though in the objective case, are placed before
the verb,

136, 159
Personal pronouns are unnecessary, when the noun itself
is expressed,

135, 136
The pronoun that is frequently applied to persons as well
as to things,

136
This is sometimes indispensible,

136
The pronoun whichsoever, &c. may be elegantly divided, 136
The objective case of the personal pronouns, is improper-
ly used instead of these and those,

136
What is improperly used for that,

137
The pronoun who is often misapplied for which,

137
The relative who not applicable to little children,

137
When the name of a person is used, merely as a name,
which should be used instead of who,

137, 138
The relative often attended with ambiguity, 138, 266, 267
It is and it was, are often used in a plural construction, 138
What case of the pronoun does the interjection require, 138
The neuter pronoun it often refers to the masculine, and
the feminine gender,

139
The pronoun it has various applications,

139
The relative is sometimes the nominative to the verb, 139
In what cases, it has a different construction,

139
When the pronoun is interrogative, what case follows it, 140
The relative may agree with either of two 'nominatives
of different persons,

141
Adjective pronouns agree in number with their nouns,

141
This means, that means, are correct phrases,

142145
That refers to the former, this to the latter,

145
Each, every, either, refer to the singular number,

146
The copulative and makes no difference, with regard to
this rule,

Key, p. 32. the Note

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PRONOUN. In what cases the pronoun should be omit-
ted; in what cases repeated,

190
How to be pointed,

238
PROPRIETY of language. Rules to promote it, viz.
Low expressions to be avoided,

251
i Words that are wanting to be supplied,

252
The same word not to be used in different senses,

252
The improper use of technical terms, to be avoided, 253
Ambiguous words not to be used,

253
Unintelligible expressions to be avoided,

253
All words that are not fully adapted to the meaning, to
be rejected,

256
PROSE and verse distinguished,

228
PROSODY,

204_233
See Accent, Quantity, Emphasis, Pausés, Tones, Feet, and

Melody.
PUNCTUATION,

234-249
Varied according to the length and proportion of
the clauses,

234, 240
It may be considered as either long or short,

234, 240
Properly treated as a distinct article,

234
See Comma, Semicolon, Colon, and Period.

See also Characters.
PURITY of style. Rules for promoting it,

250, 251

Q.

QUANTITY. Its nature and variations,

209, 210
General Rules for determining the quantity of vowels, 209, 210
For the various quantity of each of the vowels, see page 20, &c,

R.

RELATION. Things related in point of time, should have
a correspondent expression,

163-167
In relating particular declarations of others, what tense
should be used,

Key, p. 43, 44
RELATIVES. See Pronouns.
REPETITION of words, when proper, when improper, see
Ellipsis, and

Key, p. 614-67
RHYME. Its definition,

220

S.

SEMICOLON. Rules for applying it,

240, 241
SENTENCES. They are of various kinds, 125, 126, 234
Long and short should be duly blended,

261, 262
Their members should be proportionably arranged, 266

See Member and Clause.
SHALL and will. Their peculiar application, 81, 82, 90
SIMILE. Its nature and use-Directions for using it most
advantageously,

293, 294

SIMPLE and compound tenses how formed,

92
SOUND of the letters. See Vowels and Consonants.
SPEECH. How it is formed,

30-32
See Parts of Speech
SPELLING. See Words.
STANDARD of propriety. What forms it in language, 144
STRENGTH of a sentence. Rules to promote it, viz.
All redundant expressions to be pruned,

271-274
The use of copulatives, relatives, &c. to be attended to, 274277
The capital words to be judiciously disposed, 277-279
A strong assertion not to be followed by a weaker one, 279
An adverb, a preposition, &c. should not conclude the
sentence,

280, 281
Where there is resemblance, or contrast, the language
should be correspondent,

281, 282
The harmony of the words and members must be re-
garded,

282-287
SUBJUNCTIVE mood. Its true nature and extent in En-
glish,

See Mood ; and also pages 82, 94, 95
SUBORDINATE rules of the Grammar, Exercises, and Key,

numbered to denote their correspondence, 127. Exercises, 50
SUBSEQUENT to the interrogative.In what cases this
term is proper,

57, 59, 140
SUBSTANTIVE phrase. See Participle.
SYLLABLES. General rules for dividing words into syl-
lables,

33, 34
Words with a mixture of long and short syllables, are the
most melodious,

283
SYNECDOCHE. The nature of this figure,

294
SYNONYMOUS words. Injudicious use of words termed

synonymous, is the great source of a loose style, 259261
Few, if any, words are perfectly synonymous,

260, 261
SYNTAX,

125_-203
See its rules under the Article, the Noun, and the other

parts of speech.
Its
most comprehensive rule,

193

T.

75, 76

TENSE. Six tenses belong to the English verb,

72
Their nature and distinctions explained at large, 72--75
They are definite or indefinite, perfect or imperfect,
TENSES. They are composed of the principal verb

and its auxiaries; and these parts constitute one
verb,

76–78, 95, 96, 100_-102
The present names of the lenses justifiable,

79
How far the tenses of the Indicative and Subjunctive
moods vary in their forms,

81, 82, 94, 95, 178-184
The tenses of verbs should exactly correspond with re-
lative actions and events,

163
When the present, and when the perfect, of the infini-
tive, should be used,

163-166
The same teoses are connected by conjunctions, 176-

TERMINATION of a verb is altered, when contingency
and futurity concur,

180, 181
This point elucidated, Exercises 86-88. Key, 55-58
TERMŚ used to designate the three past tenses, supported, 79

Established terms and arrangements, not to be rejected, 78-81
THAN and but, explained at large,

187. Key, p. 61
THAT, as a relative, often useful, sometimes indispensable, 136°
TIME. See Relation and Tenses.
TONES. Their nature and ase,

218
In what respect different from Emphasis,

218
Rules and limitations respecting them,

219

U.

U. A. instead of an is to be used before words beginning
with the long u,

27, 40
UNITY of a sentence. Rules to promote it, viz.
The scene to be changed as little as possible,

267
Things but slightly connected should not be crowded in-
to one sentence,

268, 270
Every unnecessary parenthesis to be avoided, 270, 271

V.

63

VARIATION. What degree of it will constitute a dis-
tinct mood of the verb,

95
When proper in the auxiliaries of the verb,

179183
VERB. How divided ---The division justified,
Distinction between active and neuter verbs,

64
The true nature of the English verb explained and
vindicated,

64–66, 99, 102
A few terminations of the English verb, are sufficient for
every purpose,

66, 67
Conjugation explained,

78
The advantage to the student of co ng the verb in
all its tenses,

82
The peculiar uses of conjugating the active verb with the
present participle and verb to be,

95
Mode of conjugating a passive verb,

96
Observations on passive verbs,

99-102
The conjugation of an English verb at large, is a regular
and beautiful exhibition,

101
A comprehensive list of irregular verbs,

102-107
Particular contractions and obsolete words to be avoided, 107
When the regular or the irregular verb is to be preferred, 107
Defective verbs. Their nature-A list of them,

108
But one conjugation of English verbs, and why,

10S
Impersonal verbs. None in the language,

108
Advantages and disadvantages of the mode of conjugating
the English verb,

109
The phrases as follows, as appears, furm what are called
itpersonal verbs,

129

Peculiar cases of difficuliy in determining whether the

verb is to be in the singular, or the plural number, 131, 132
Active verbs govern the objective case,

159
Neuter verbs govern no case,

159, 160
Irregular practice of writers, in using certain neuter verbs
as if they were active,

160
Active verbs sometimes improperly made neuter,

160
The neuter verb is generally varied like the active, but
sometimes it admits the passive form,

99, 160
The verb to be is a conductor of cases, 160, 161. Exercises, 71
Passive verbs of naming, their construction,

161
One verb governs another in the Infinitive,

161
The Infinitive is often improperly used,

162
Verbs expressive of hope, desire, &c. are invariably follow-
ed by the present of the Infinitive,

164
In what cases the form of the verb is influenced by a con-
junction ; in what cases it is not,

178, 184
When the verb should be omitted, when re-
peated,

190, 191. Key, 66
How it should be pointed,

236, 239
See Mood, Tense, Number, Person, Participle, Auxiliary,

and Nominative Case.
VERSE. Distinction between verse and prose,

228
Trochaic, Iambic, and other verses explained,

221
Their different effects exhibited,

224-227
VERSIFICATION. Its constituents and rules, 220_233
VOWELS and Consonants. A minute scale of them, 15-17
Their peculiar and various sounds explained and ex-
emplified,

20-29
Importance of being able to pronounce them accurately, 17–32
Vowels give softness, consonants strength, to words, 282
See Consonant.

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W, shown to be sometimes a vowel sometimes a con-
sonant,

17, 28
WORDS. Number of them in the English language,

108
The same word often forms different parts of
speech,

58, 110, 115, 116
This point exemplified,

Exercises, 9, 10
Rules for spelling them,

34-37
Three capital faults in using them,

258
Redundant words and members to be pruned, 271-274
The little words, but, and, or, then, &c. are frequently of
the greatest importance,

274277
The chief word or words of a sentence, how to be
placed,

277-279
Words and phrases related in point of time,

163_166
WRITING unintelligibly. The principal causes of it enu-
merated,

255, 256

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