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[See Preface, 152.]

A.

62

ABSOLUTE. Case Absolute-Its nature explained,

70, 129
It belongs to no verb, expressed or implied,

128
How to be parsed,

201
How to be pointed,

237
ACCENT. Its nature and distinctions,

206209
Accent dignifies syllables; emphasis, words,

212
Manner of pronouncing the unaccented vowels, denotes
the speaker's education,

29
By what marks signified,

246
ACCUSATIVE case. The same as the objective,

48
ADDRESS to the young students, on the use and abuse of
their literary attainments,

306310
ADJECTIVE. The definition of it,
It is varied only by degrees of Comparison,

52
Whether the positive is a degree of comparison,

52
Various modes of forming the degrees of comparison, 53
How adjectives become nouns, and nouns adjectives, 53,54,160
Though the degrees of comparison are indefinite in num-
ber, yet language requires but few of them,

54
The superlative of Eminence, and the superlative of Com-
parison, distinguished,

55
Every adjective has its substantive,

141
Adjectives improperly used as adverbs,

146, 147
Rules for avoiding this impropriety,

Exercises, 113
Adjective pronoun such is often misapplied,

147
ADJECTIVE. Double comparatives and superlatives im-
proper,

147
Adjectives having a superlative signification, do not admit
of comparison,

148
Degrees of it often inaccurately applied,

148, 149
In particular cases, the adjective and noun should not be
separated,

149
When placed before, when after its noun,

149, 150
A plural adjective pronoun will sometimes associate with
a singular noun,

150
In what cases to be omitted, in what repeated,

189
How to be pointed,

236
ADJECTIVE pronoun. See Pronoun.
ADJUNCTS. Their nature and punctuation,

237, 239
ADVERB. Its nature, origin, and varieties,

109-112

The same word occasionally used as an adverb, an ad-
jective, or a substantive,

112. See Words.
Adverbs of time not superseded by the tenses of verbs-
and why,

112
Adverbs improperly used as adjectives,

146
This point elucidated, (See Verb.) Exercises, 63. Key, 32
Rules to determine when the adverb, and when the ad.
jective, should be used,

Exercises, 113
Its appropriate situation in general,

169, 263
The adverb never commonly precedes the verb,

171
The adverb where improperly used for in which,

171
Adverbs improperly used for substantives,

171, 172
When to be omitted,

191
How to be pointed,

237, 240
See Negatires.
AFFIRMATION is not the essence of the verb, 65, 66, 69
ALLEGORY. Its nature. Rules for using it properly, 292, 293
ALPHABET. Nature of a perfect one,

15
The English alphabet imperfect,

15, 17
ANTITHESIS. Its nature, 298–It should be discreetly used, 298
APOLOGY for the author's frequent additions to his gram.
matical works,

Key, p. iii
APOSTROPHE. The nature and use of this figure,

297
See Characters.
APPOSITION. Rule respecting the cases of nouns in ap-
position,

154, 161. Exercises, 71
Nouns in this state how to be pointed,

237
See Nouns.
ARRANGEMENT. A skilful arrangement of words and men-

bers promotes perspicuity; 138, 149, 169, 170, 262, 263, 267
It also promotes ihe strength of a sentence,

277, 281
It conduces to the larmmony of language,

283, 286
ARTICLE. Its nature, use, and importance, 40—43, 151
The article a agrees with nouns in the singular number

only : the article the with nouns in both numbers, 151
Omitting or using the article a forms a nice distinction in
the sense,

152
ARTICLE. When to be omitted, when repeated,

152, 153, 188, 189, 25%
Article the used as an epithet of distinction,

153
Article the is sometimes used instead of the possessive
pronoun,

153
It sometimes governs the participle,

167
ARTICULATION. The nature of it explained,

30-33
AUXILIARY verbs. Their nature, use, and importance,

65, 71, 72, 77, 87-94
The same verb is sometimes an ausiliary, sometimes a
principal,

89
Their forn in the Subjunctive Mood,

S2, 90, 177, 182
This form exemplified, Exercises, 85-88. Key 54--58
Auxiliary and principal constitute but one
verb,

76, 77, 92, 99, 100
Auxiliary and principal form a compound tense,

92
The auxiliaries should, utuld, &c. refer occasionally to
*6.it, past, 22d future **

75, 83, 164

AUXILIARY. The auxillary let governs the objective

161
When to be omitted, or repeated,

190, 191. Keg, 66
Auxiliary words abound in English, and in other moderu
tongues,

109

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THE BIBLE. The present translation of it is the best stans

dard of the English language,
DR. BLAIR'S recommendation of the study of grammar

and composition,

146

5, 6

C.

CADENCE. Its nature and how to be managed,

217
The close of a sentence should not be abrupt, or unplea-
sant,

286
CÆSURA and demi-cæsura. The nature of these poetical
pauses explained,

227, 229
CAPITAL letters. Rule respecting the use of them, 248, 249

Mode of exercising the student in them, Exercises, 125
CASE. Only three in English,

48
Mode of forming cases in Latin, not applicable to our lan-
guage,

50
Reasons in support of an objective case attached to En-
glish nouns,

61, 52, 100
The verb to be has the same case before and after it,

161
This rule applies also, if the verb is not expressed, Exer. 71
Passive verbs of naming have the same case before and
after them,

161. Exercises, 71
Rules which determine the possessive case,

153, 158
Rules which determine the objective case,

159, 163
The same cases of nouns and pronouns are connected by
conjunctions,

176
See Nominative Case. Possessive Case.
CASE absolute. See Absolute.
CHARACTERS. Particular ones used in composition, 245, 247
CLAUSE of a sentence explained,

125
CLEARNESS of a sentence. Rules to promote it, viz.
The proper position of adverbs,

263
The due position of circumstances,

263
The proper disposition of relatives, &c.

266, 267
CLIMAX. The nature of this figure,

303
COLON. Directions for using it,

241, 242
COMMA. Rules for applying it in all its varieties, 23.-240
COMPARISON. Its rules as a figure of speech,

293
Comparative members how to pointed,

238
See Adjectives.
CONCORD and government explained,

126
CONJUGATION See Verb.

CONJUNCTIONS. Their nature and distinctions 115, 116
Their peculiar use and importance,

117, 118
The copulative and disjunctive conjunction operate differ-
ently on the verb,

130, 133
'Their power in determining the mood of verbs, 95, 176
In what cases they influence the form of verbs, and in
what cases they do not,

177, 184, 185
Some of them require correspondent conjuctions,

185
Often used improperly, both singly and in pairs,

185
Different effects of omitting or repeating them,

186, 187, 191, 275, 276
The nature and construction of than and but, explained
at large,

187. Key, p. 61-63
CONJUNCTIVE termination. The instances stated, in
which it is to be applied to the verb,

94, 179, 184
CONSONANT. Its precise nature and divisions,

17, 18
Distinction between its name and nature, is of great im-
portance,

18
How to apply consonants most advantageously, 282, 284
See Vorvels and Consonants.

D.

DASH. In what cases to be applied,

243
DECLENSION. The noun and pronoun declined, 49, 56
But one declension in English,

50, 51
More than one would be useless and improper,

50, 51
ĐERIVATION. Ways in which words are derived from
one another,

119-122
Remarks on the system of Horne Tooke,

122
DERIVATION. Various sources whence the English lan-
guage is derived,

123_142
DISPOSITION of words and members. See Arrangement.

E.

192

Key, 66

ELLIPSIS. Its nature and importance,

187
It is frequently unnescessary,

188
It is sometimes improper,

188
The propriety or impropriety of the Ellipsis, with respect
to all the parts of speech,

198—192
Special cases of improper Ellipsis,
In what cases Auxiliaries are to be omitted, or repeated,

before the principal verb,
EMPHASIS. Nature and necessity of it explained, 211-214
The great regulator of Quantity--and sometimes of Ac-
cent,

213
The great Rule for managing it,

215
ENGLISH language. Its own idiom and principles, must
be observed,

76, 77, 95, 96, 99— 102
EQUIVALENCE in sense does not imply similarity in gram-

matical construction,
ETYMOLOGY,

38-124

65, 66

See Article, Noun, and the other parts of Speech.
Etymological and Syntactical parsing,

195-203
EXCEPTIONS to the Second Rule of Syntax,

Key, p. 32
EXCLAMATION. Rules for applying the point, 244, 245
A figure of speech,

297
EXERCISES. of great importance to the student, Exercises, iii. iv.
Promiscuous Exercises in Orthography, Exercises, 36. Key, 5

in Syntax Exercises, 98. Key, 69
- in Punctuation, Exercises, 128. Key, 100

in Perspicuity, Exercises, 173. Key, 141
Bee Grtimmatical Exercises.

F.

FEET. See Poetical Feet.
FIGURES of speech. Their nature and use, and the rules
for applying them properly,

287-305
FINITE verbs. Their nature as distinguished from verbs
in the infinitive mood,

125
FRENCH idioms. Some of them imitated in English, 138, 153
Some of them to be avoided,

162, 160, 171, 231

G.

the sex,

GENDER. Three methods, in English, of distinguishing

44, 45
GENITIVE case. Its meaning,

49
The double genitive, in what cases allowable, 157, 158

See Possessive Case.
GRAMMAR. Its utility and importance,

5
The philosophy of grammar recommended,

4
The grammar of other languages, and the sentiments of
various English grammarians, occasionally noticed,

4, 5
The grammatical discussions, dispersed through the book,

peculiary useful to students,
Objections to the system. See Objections.
GRAMMATICAL exercises. Their use and importance,

Exercises, iii. iy.
Vulgar and glaring errors totally improper for such a work,

Exercises, vii.
They should be introduced into the earliest stages of gram-

matical studies--Reasons for this opinion, Exercises, vüji.
Particular directions for using them, Exercises, X.---xili.
GREEK and Latin. When to be imitated, when to be de-

viated from, in English construction, 49, 77, 80, 96, 100, 102

6

H.

H. Particular attention due to the sound of this letter, 16, 23, 41
HARMONY of words and members promotes the strength
of a sentence,

282

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