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A well-poized mind makes a cheerful countenance.

A certain householder planted a vineyard, but the men employed in it made ungrateful returns.

Let us show diligence in every laudable under iaking.

Cinnamon is the fragrant bark of a low trec in the island of Ceylon.

A ram will bult with his head, though he be brought up tame, and never saw the action.

We perceive a piece of silver in a basin, when water is poured on it, though we could not discover it before.

Virtue embalms the memory of the good.

The king of Great Britain is a limited monarch, and the British nation a free people.

The physician may dispense the medicine, but Providence alone can bless it.

In many pursuits, we embark with pleasure, and land sorrowfully.

Rocks, mountains, and caverns, are of indispensable use, both to the earth and to man.

The hive of a city, or kingdom, is in the best condition, when there is the least noise or buzz in it.

The roughnesses found on our entrance into the paths of virtue and learning, grow smoother as we advance.

That which was once the most beautiful spot of Italy, covered with palaces, embellished by princes, and celebrated by poets, has now nothing to show but ruins.

Battering rams were anciently used to beat down the walls of a city.

Jockey signifies a man who rides horses in a race; or who deals in horses.

The harmlessness of many animals, and the engoyment which they have of life, should plead for them against cruel zusage.

We may be rery busy, to no useful purpose.

We cannot plead in abatement of our guilt, that we are ignorant of our duty.

Genuine charity, how liberal soever it may be, will never empoverish ourselves. If we sow sparingly, we shall reap accordingly.

However disagreeable, we must resolutely perform our duty.

A fit of sickness is often a kind chastisement ana discipline, to moderate our affections for the things of this life.

It is a happiness to young persons, when they are preserved from the snares of the world, as in a garden enclosed.

Health and peace, the most valuable possessions, are obtained at small expense.

Incense signifies perfumes exhaled by fire, and made use of in religious cercmonies.

True happiness is an enemy to pomp and noise. Few reflections are more distressing, than those which we make on our own ingratitude.

There is an inseparable connexion between piety and virtue.

Many actions have a fair complexion, which have not sprüng from virtue.

Which way soever we turn ourselves, we are encountered with sensible deinonstrations of a Deity.

If we forsake the ways of virtue, we cannot allege any colour of ignorance, or want of instruction,

SECTION 3.

Exercises, p. 40. There are more cultivators of the earth, than of their own hearts.

Man is encompassed with dangers innumerable.

War is attended with distressful and desolating effects. It is confessedly the scourge of our angry passions. The earth is, the Lord's, and the fulness thereof.

The harvest truly is plenteous, but the labourers are few.

The greater our incitements to evil, the greater will be our victory and reward.

We should not encourage persons to do what they believe to be wrong.

Virtue is placed between two extremes, which are both equally blamable.

We should continually have the goal in our view, which would direct us in the race.

The gaols were forced open, and the prisoners set free.

It cannot be said that we are charitable donors, when our gifts proceed from selfish motives.

Strait is the gate and narrow the way, that lead to life eternal.

Integrity leads us straight forward, disdaining all doublings and crooked paths.

Licentiousness and crimes pave the way to ruin.

Words are the counters of wise men, but the money of fools.

Recompense to no man evil for evil. He was an excellent person ; a mirror of ancient faith in early youth.

Meekness controls our angry passions : candour, our severe judgments.

He is not only a descendant from pious ancestors, but an inheritor too of their virtues.

A dispensary is the place where medicines are dispensed: a dispensatory is a book in which the composition of them is described.

Faithfulness and judgment are peculiarly requisite in testamentary erecutors.

To be faithful among the faithless, argues great strength of principle.

Mountains appear to be like so many wens or unnatural protuberances on the face of the earth. In some places the sea encroaches upon the land

, .n others, the land

upon

the sea.

Philosophers agreed in despising riches, as the encumbrances of life.

Wars are regulated robberies and piracies.

Fishes increase more than beasts or birds, as apa pears from their numerous spawn.

The pyramids of Egypt have stood more than three thousand years.

Precepts have small influence, when not enforced by example.

How has kind Heav'n adorn'd the happy land,
And scatter'd blessings with a wasteful hand.

A friend exaggerates a man's virtues, an enemy inflames his crimes. .

A witty and humorous vein has often produced enemies.

Neither pleasure nor business should engross our time and affections; proper seasons should be atlotted for retivement.

It is laudable to inquire before we determine.

Many have been visited with afflictions, who have not profited by them.

We may be successful, and yet disappointedo

SECTION 4.

Exercises, p. 42. The experience of want enhances the value of plenty.

To maintain opinions stifily, is no evidence of their truth, or of our moderation.

Hoarhound has been famous for its medicinal qualities : but it is now little used.

The wicked are often insnared in the trap which they tay for others.

It is hard to say what diseases are curable: they are all under the guidance of Heaven.

Instructers should not only be skilful in those

scienees which they teach ; but have skill in the method of teaching, and patience in the practice,

Science strengthens and enlarges the minds of men.

A steady mind may receive counsel; but there is no hold on a changeable humour.

We may inure ourselves by custom, to bear the extremities of weather without injury.

Excessive merriment is the parent of grief.

Air is sensible to the touch liy its motion, and by its resistance to bodies moved in it.

A polite address is sometimes the cloak of malice.

To practice virtue is the sure way to love it.

Many things are plausible in theory, which fail in practise.

Learning and knowledge must be attained by slow degrees : and are the reward only of diligence and patience.

We should study to live peaceably with all men.

A soul that can securely death defy,
And count it nature's privilege to die.

Whatever promotes the interest of the soul, is also conducive to our present felicity.

Let not the sternness of virtue affright us ; she will soon become amiable.

The spacious firmament on high,
With all the blue eihereal sky,
And spangled heav'ns, a shining frame,
Their great Original proclaim.

Passion is the drunkenness of the mind : it supersedes the workings of reason.

If we are sincere, we may be assured of an advocate to intercede for us.

We ought not to consider the increase of another's reputation, as a diminution of our own.

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