Memoirs of the Dukes of Urbino, Illustrating the Arms, Arts, and Literature of Italy, from 1440 to 1630, Band 2

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1851
 

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Seite 81 - And put it to the foil : but you, O you, So perfect, and so peerless, are created Of every creature's best.
Seite 238 - Stones leap'd to form, and rocks began to live; With sweeter notes each rising Temple rung; A Raphael painted, and a Vida sung.
Seite 361 - twas a famous victory. "My father lived at Blenheim then, Yon little stream hard by; They burnt his dwelling to the ground, And he was forced to fly: So with his wife and child he fled, Nor had he where to rest his head.
Seite 361 - They say it was a shocking sight after the field was won; for many thousand bodies here lay rotting in the sun; but things like that, you know, must be after a famous victory. Great praise the Duke of Marlbro' won, and our good Prince Eugene. "Why, 'twas a very wicked thing!" said little Wilhelmine. "Nay... nay... my little girl," quoth he, "it was a famous victory.
Seite 43 - Say, for you saw us, ye immortal lights, How oft unwearied have we spent the nights, Till the Ledaean stars, so famed for love, Wonder'd at us from above! We spent them not in toys, in lusts, or wine ; But search of deep Philosophy, Wit, Eloquence, and Poetry, Arts which I loved, for they, my friend, were thine.
Seite 167 - Amid the wrangling schools — a SPIRIT hung, Beautiful region ! o'er thy towns and farms, Statues and temples, and memorial tombs ; And emanations were perceived ; and acts Of immortality, in Nature's course, Exemplified by mysteries, that were felt As bonds, on grave philosopher imposed And armed warrior ; and in every grove A gay or pensive tenderness prevailed, When piety more awful had relaxed. ' Take, running river, take these locks of mine...
Seite 18 - Let greatness of her glassy sceptres vaunt, " Not sceptres, no, but reeds, soon bruis'd, soon broken; " And let this worldly pomp our wits enchant, " All fades, and scarcely leaves behind a token. " Those golden palaces, those gorgeous halls, " With furniture superfluously fair, " Those stately courts, those sky-encount'ring walls, " Evanish all, like vapours in the air.
Seite 55 - And, throned immortal by his side, A woman sits with eye sublime, — Aspasia, all his spirit's bride ; But, if their solemn love were crime, Pity the beauty and the sage, — Their crime was in their darkened age. He perished, but his wreath was won, — He perished in his height of fame ; Then sunk the cloud on Athens' sun, Yet still she conquered in his name.
Seite xxiii - Refined policy ever has been the parent of confusion ; and ever will be so, as long as the world endures. Plain good intention, which is as easily discovered at the first view, as fraud is surely detected at last, is, let me say, of no mean force in the government of mankind. Genuine simplicity of heart is an healing and cementing principle.
Seite 142 - ... which had a continued plot apart from the comedy, as follows. There was, in the first place, the battle of these earthborn brothers, showing, under the fabulous allegory of Jason, how wars prevail among neighbours who ought to maintain peace. Then came Love, successively kindling with a holy flame men and earth, sea and air, to chase away war and discord, and to unite the world in harmony : the union is but a hope for the future; the discord is, to our misfortune, a present fact. I had not meant...

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