The life of Benjamin Franklin: with many choice anecdotes and admirable sayings of this great man, never before published by any of his biographers

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U. Hunt, 1835 - 239 Seiten
 

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Seite 137 - I stopped my horse lately where a great number of people were collected at an auction of merchants' goods. The hour of the sale not being come, they were conversing on the badness of the times; and one of the company called to a plain, clean old man, with white locks; — "Pray, Father Abraham, what think you of the times? Will not these heavy taxes quite ruin the country? How shall we ever be able to pay them? What would you advise us to?" Father Abraham stood up and replied, "If you would have...
Seite 219 - Thus I consent, Sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better, and because I am not sure that it is not the best. The opinions I have had of its errors I sacrifice to the public good. I have never whispered a syllable of them abroad. Within these walls they were born, and here they shall die.
Seite 142 - This doctrine, my friends, is reason and wisdom , but, after all, do not depend too much upon your own industry, and frugality, and prudence, though excellent things, for they may all be blasted, without- the blessing of Heaven ; and, therefore, ask that blessing humbly, and be not uncharitable to those that at present seem to want it, but comfort and help them. Remember, Job suffered, and was afterward prosperous. " And now, to conclude, Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no...
Seite 139 - Master will do more Work than both his Hands; and again, Want of Care does us more Damage than want of Knowledge; and again, Not to oversee Workmen is to leave them your Purse open. Trusting too much to others...
Seite 141 - If you would know the value of money, go and try to borrow some; for he that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing...
Seite 141 - And again, Pride is as loud a beggar as Want, and a great deal more saucy. When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece; but Poor Dick says, It is easier to suppress the first desire, than to satisfy all that follow it.
Seite 140 - You call them goods ; but if you do not take care they will prove evils to some of you. You expect they will be sold cheap, and perhaps they may for less than they cost ; but if you have no occasion for them they must be dear to you.
Seite 140 - What maintains one Vice, would bring up two Children. "You may think perhaps, that a little Tea, or a little Punch now and then, Diet a little more costly, Clothes a little finer, and a little Entertainment now and then, can be no great Matter; but remember what Poor Richard says, Many a Little makes a Mickle; and farther, Beware of little Expenses; A small Leak will sink a great Ship; and again. Who Dainties love, shall Beggars prove; and moreover, Fools make Feasts, and wise Men eat them.
Seite 141 - Pride breakfasted with Plenty, dined with Poverty, and supped with Infamy.' And after all, of what use is this pride of appearance for which so much is risked, so much is suffered? It cannot promote health nor ease pain ; it makes no increase of merit in the person ; it creates envy ; it hastens misfortune.
Seite 238 - THE BODY of BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, Printer, (like the cover of an old book, its contents torn out, and stript of its lettering and gilding) lies here food for worms ; yet the work itself shall not be lost, for it will (as he believed) appear once more in a new and more beautiful edition, corrected and amended by THE AUTHOR.

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