The Citizen of a Republic: What are His Rights, His Duties, and Privileges, and what Should be His Education

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Paine and Burgess, 1845 - 190 Seiten
 

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Seite 87 - Lord, before the priests and the judges, which shall be in those days; and the judges shall make diligent inquisition: and behold, if the witness be a false witness, and hath testified falsely against his brother; Then shall ye do unto him, as he had thought to have done unto his brother: so shalt thou put the evil away from among you.
Seite 11 - The best portraits are perhaps those in which there is a slight mixture of caricature, and we are not certain that the best histories are not those in which a little of the exaggeration of fictitious narrative is judiciously employed. Something is lost in accuracy; but much is gained in effect.
Seite 79 - JUSTUM et tenacem propositi virum Non civium ardor prava jubentium, Non vultus instantis tyranni Mente quatit solida, neque Auster, Dux inquieti turbidus Adriae, 5 Nee fulminantis magna manus Jovis : Si fractus illabatur orbis, * Impavidum ferient ruinae.
Seite 11 - The best portraits are those in which there is a slight mixture of caricature ; and we are not aware that the best histories are not those in which a little of the exaggeration of fictitious narrative is judiciously employed. Something is lost in accuracy; but much is gained in effect. The fainter lines are neglected ; but the great characteristic features are imprinted on the mind for ever. The history terminates with the death of Lorenzo de Medici.
Seite 11 - ... that the best histories are not those in which a little of the exaggeration of fictitious narrative is judiciously employed. Something is lost in accuracy ; but much is gained in effect. The fainter lines are neglected ; but the great characteristic features are imprinted on the mind for ever. The History terminates with the death of Lorenzo de' Medici.- Machiavelli had, it seems, intended to continue his narrative to a later period.
Seite 2 - LESTER, and designed to elucidate the genius, the live* and times of some of the most celebrated of the Italian literati. The romance, of which a spirited and elegant translation has there been given, is characterized by competent judges, as one of the best, if not the very best, in the Italian tongue. Its incidents and scenery carry us back to the golden age of the Medici, and introduce us to an intimate and familiar acquaintanceship with the pervading genius and spirit of an era sacred to, every...
Seite xi - is a work," says the Biblioteca Enciclopedica Italiana, "enriched with elegant learning, and written with all that terseness and solemn earnestness of style, which characterized the great writers of the brilliant ages of the republics of antiquity. The man who best restrains his appetites and lusts — who is the most prudent in public deliberations — the most Justin every private and public relation of family and of society, is, in the estimation of Ansaldo Ceba, the best citizen.
Seite 9 - North," and an analysis of his critical powers ; a defence of Machiavelli —spoken of as " a man of profound thought, of great sagacity, of indomitable 'will, and unrivalled during his time, if not in knowledge of the human, at least in knowledge of the Italian, heart; "—new remarks on " Leigh Hunt," " Festus," and the effects of travel on literary wares.
Seite 182 - La gente nuova ei subiti guadagni Orgoglio e dismisura han generata, Fiorenza, in te; sì che tu già ten piagni.
Seite 190 - ... incesserunt et coturnati, simul exierunt, excalceantur et ad staturam suam redeunt. Nemo istorum, quos divitiae honoresque in altiore fastigio ponunt, magnus est. Quare ergo magnus videtur? cum basi illum sua metirìs.

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