Almost Shakespeare: Reinventing His Works for Cinema and Television

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James R. Keller, Leslie Stratyner
McFarland, 04.11.2014 - 203 Seiten
In the past two decades, Othello has tried out for the basketball team, Macbeth has taken over a fast food joint and King Lear has moved to an Iowa farm--Shakespeare is everywhere in popular culture. This collection of essays addresses the use of Shakespearean narratives, themes, imagery and characterizations in non-Shakespearian cinema. The essays explore how Shakespeare and his work are manipulated within the popular media and explore topics such as racism, jealousy, misogyny and nationality. The submissions concentrate on film and television programs that are adaptations of Shakespearean plays, including My Own Private Idaho, CSI-Miami, A Thousand Acres, Prospero's Books, O, 10 Things I Hate About You, Withnail and I, Get Over It, and The West Wing. Each chapter includes notes and a list of works cited. A full bibliography completes the work; it is divided into bibliographies and filmographies, general studies and essays, derivatives based on a single play, derivatives based on several, and derivatives based on Shakespeare as a character. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

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Inhalt

Introduction
1
The Politics of Culture The Plays the Thing
7
Imitation as Originality in Gus Van Sants My Own Private Idaho
22
Shakespeare Transposed The British Stage on the PostColonial Screen
42
Suture Shakespeare and Race Or What Is Our Cultural Debt to the Bard?
57
Cinema in the Round SelfReflexivity in Tim Blake Nelsons O
73
Sex Lies Videotape and Othello
86
The Time Is Out of Joint Withnail and I and Historical Melancholia
99
Horatio The First CSI
113
Teen Scenes Recognizing Shakespeare in Teen Film
122
An Aweful Rule Safe Schools Hard Canons and Shakespeares Loose Heirs
137
Prosperous Pharmacy Peter Greenaway and the Critics Play Shakespeares Mimetic Game
155
Shakespeare Film and Television Derivatives A Bibliography
169
Contributors
190
Index
193
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Seite 102 - I have of late, — but wherefore I know not, — lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, — why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.
Seite 47 - The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne, Burn'd on the water ; the poop was beaten gold, Purple the sails, and so perfumed that The winds were love-sick with them, the oars were silver, Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made The water which they beat to follow faster, As amorous of their strokes.
Seite 68 - Mongolian, the Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second-sight in this American world, — a world which yields him no true self-consciousness, but only lets him see himself through the revelation of the other world.
Seite 115 - And let me speak, to the yet unknowing world, How these things came about: So shall you hear Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts; Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters; Of deaths put on by cunning, and forc'd cause ; And, in this upshot, purposes mistook Fall'n on the inventors' heads: all this can I Truly deliver.
Seite 167 - Be not afeard ; the isle is full of noises, Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not. Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments Will hum about mine ears, and sometimes voices That, if I then had waked after long sleep, Will make me sleep again : and then, in dreaming, The clouds methought would open and show riches Ready to drop upon me, that, when I waked, I cried to dream again.
Seite 46 - Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale Her infinite variety. Other women cloy The appetites they feed: but she makes hungry Where most she satisfies...
Seite 7 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more, Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility ; But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger...
Seite 47 - Noblest of men, woo't die? Hast thou no care of me ? shall I abide In this dull world, which in thy absence is No better than a sty? — O, see, my women, The crown o' the earth doth melt: — My lord!
Seite 120 - But down these mean streets a man must go who is not himself mean, who is neither tarnished nor afraid. The detective in this story must be such a man. He is the hero, he is everything.
Seite 66 - Set you down this; And say besides, that in Aleppo once, Where a malignant and a turban'd Turk Beat a Venetian and traduced the state, I took by the throat the circumcised dog, And smote him, thus.

Über den Autor (2014)

James R. Keller is a professor and chair of the English and Theatre department at Eastern Kentucky University in Richmond, Kentucky. The author or editor of numerous works about popular culture, he lives in Lexington, Kentucky. Leslie Stratyner, a professor of English at Mississippi University for Women, lives in Columbus, Mississippi.

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