The works of Dr. Benjamin Franklin: Consisting of essays, humorous, moral, and literary: with his life

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S. Andrus & Son, 1851 - 304 Seiten
 

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Seite 298 - Constitution. For, when you assemble a number of men to have the advantage of their joint wisdom, you inevitably assemble with those men all their prejudices, their passions, their errors of opinion, their local interests, and their selfish views. From such an assembly can a perfect production be expected ? It therefore astonishes me, sir, to find this system approaching so near to perfection as it does...
Seite 264 - And again, Three removes are as bad as a fire ; and again, Keep thy shop, and thy shop will keep thee ; and again, If you would have your business done, go ; if not, send. And again — He that by the plough would thrive, Himself must either hold or drive.
Seite 174 - When I saw another fond of popularity, constantly employing himself in political bustles, neglecting his own affairs, and ruining them by that neglect, He pays, indeed, said I, too much for his whistle.
Seite 263 - He that riseth late must trot all day, and shall scarce overtake his business at night; while Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him. Drive thy business, let not that drive thee, and Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise, as Poor Richard says.
Seite 269 - Gain may be temporary and uncertain; but ever, while you live, expense is constant and certain : and ' It is easier to build two chimneys than to keep one in fuel,' as poor Richard says. So 'Rather go to bed supperless than rise in debt.' 'Get what you can, and what you get, hold; 'Tis the stone that will turn all your lead into gold,
Seite 297 - In these sentiments, sir, I agree to this Constitution, with all its faults, if they are such; because I think a general government necessary for us, and there is no form of government but what may be a blessing to the people if well administered, and...
Seite 172 - Good," which, I think, was written by your father. It had been so little regarded by a former possessor that several leaves of it were torn out, but the remainder gave me such a turn of thinking as to have an influence on my conduct through life; for I have always set a greater value on the character of a doer of good than on any other kind of reputation ; and if I have been, as you seem to think, a useful citizen, the public owes the advantage of it to that book.
Seite 262 - Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears; while the used key is always bright, as Poor Richard says. But dost thou love life? then do not squander time, for that's the stuff life is made of, as Poor Richard says. How much more than is necessary do we spend in sleep? forgetting, that the sleeping fox catches no poultry...
Seite 263 - Lost Time is never found again; and what we call Time enough, always proves little enough : Let us then up and be doing, and doing to the Purpose ; so by Diligence shall we do more with less Perplexity. Sloth makes all Things difficult, but Industry all easy...
Seite 189 - In short, the way to wealth, if you desire it, is as plain as the way to market. It depends chiefly on two words, industry and frugality ; that is, waste neither time nor money, but make the best use of both.

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