An essay on punctuation

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J. Walter, Charing-Cross., 1785 - 177 Seiten
 

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Seite 118 - And all they in the synagogue, when they heard these things, were filled with wrath, and rose up and thrust him out of the city, and led him unto the brow of the hill whereon their city was built, that they might cast him down headlong.
Seite 39 - Several verbs in the infinitive mood> having a common dependence, and succeeding one another, are also divided by commas ; as, To relieve the indigent, to comfort the afflicted^ to protect the innocent, to reward the deserving, are humane and noble employments.
Seite 125 - And it was known unto all the dwellers at Jerufalem ; infomuch as that field is called, in their proper tongue, Aceldama, that is to fay, the field of blood.
Seite 170 - ... one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen eighteen nineteen twenty thirty forty fifty sixty seventy eighty ninety one hundred two hundred three hundred four hundred five hundred...
Seite 121 - Men, brethren, and fathers, hear ye my defence which I make now unto you. (And when they heard that he spake in the Hebrew tongue to them, they kept the more silence : and he saith,) I am verily a man which am a Jew, born in Tarsus, a city in Cilicia, yet brought up in this city at the feet of Gamaliel, and taught according to the perfect manner of the law of the fathers, and was zealous toward God...
Seite 87 - Were all books reduced thus to their quintessence, many a bulky author would make his appearance in a penny paper: there would be scarce such a thing in nature as a folio : the works of an age would be contained on a few shelves ; not to mention millions of volumes that would be utterly annihilated.
Seite 107 - Thine own begotten, breaking violent way, Tore through my entrails, that with fear and pain...
Seite 138 - The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing. 2. The first word after a period; and, if the two sentences are totally independent, after a note of interrogation or exclamation. But if a number of interrogative or exclamatory sentences, are thrown into one general group ; or if the construction of the latter sentences depends on the former, all of them, except the first, may begin with a small letter : as, " How long, ye simple ones, will ye love simplicity ?...
Seite 82 - The pride of wealth is contemptible, the pride of learning is pitiable, the pride of dignity is ridiculous, and the pride of bigotry is insupportable.
Seite 127 - Nicodemus saith unto them, (he that came to Jesus by night, being one of them,) Doth our law judge any man, before it hear him, and know what he doeth? They answered and said unto him, Art thou also of Galilee? Search, and look: for out of Galilee ariseth no prophet.

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