Early Tudor Poetry, 1485-1547

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Macmillan, 1920 - 564 Seiten

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Seite 375 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.
Seite 20 - and tell you a truth, which perchance ye will marvel at. One of the greatest benefits that ever God gave me, is, that he sent me so sharp and severe parents, and so gentle a schoolmaster. For when I am in presence either of father or mother; whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry, or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing, or doing...
Seite 123 - The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne, Burn'd on the water ; the poop was beaten gold, Purple the sails, and so perfumed that The winds were love-sick with them, the oars were silver, Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made The water which they beat to follow faster, As amorous of their strokes.
Seite 50 - Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne, And smale fowles maken melodye, That slepen al the night with open ye, (So priketh hem nature in hir corages) : Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages...
Seite 36 - Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very heaven ! — Oh ! times, In which the meagre, stale, forbidding ways Of custom, law, and statute, took at once The attraction of a country in Romance...
Seite 19 - And these are called apprentices, and during that time they perform all the most menial of offices; and few are born who are exempted from this fate, for every one, however rich he may be, sends away his children into the houses of others, whilst he, in return, receives those of strangers into his own.
Seite 524 - THE MEANS TO ATTAIN HAPPY LIFE MARTIAL, the things that do attain The happy life be these, I find: The riches left, not got with pain; The fruitful ground, the quiet mind; The equal friend, no grudge, no strife; No charge of rule nor governance; Without disease, the healthful life; The household of continuance.
Seite 34 - Where is that happy land of Faery, Which I so much do vaunt, yet no where show, But vouch antiquities, which no body can know. But let that man with better sence...
Seite 324 - In our forefathers tyme, whan Papistrie, as a standyng poole, couered and ouerflowed all England, fewe bookes were read in our long, sauyng certaine bookes of Cheualrie, as they sayd, for pastime and pleasure, which, as some say, were made in Monasteries, by idle Monkes or wanton Chanons: as 'one for example, Morte Arthure...
Seite 298 - O Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding profane and vain babblings, and oppositions of science falsely so called: which some professing have erred concerning the faith.

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