Cross-cultural Visions in African American Modernism: From Spatial Narrative to Jazz Haiku

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Ohio State University Press, 2006 - 251 Seiten
Yoshinobu Hakutani traces the development of African American modernism, which initially gathered momentum with Richard Wright's literary manifesto "Blueprint for Negro Writing" in 1937. Hakutani dissects and discusses the cross-cultural influences on the then-burgeoning discipline in three stages: American dialogues, European and African cultural visions, and Asian and African American cross-cultural visions.
 

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Inhalt

The Chicago Renaissance Theodore Dreiser and Richard Wrights Spatial Narrative
19
The CrossCultural Vision of Ralph Ellisons Invisible Man
44
No Name in the Street James Baldwins Exploration of American Urban Culture
60
If Beale Street Could Talk Baldwins Search for Love and Identity
72
Jazz and Toni Morrisons Urban Imagination of Desire and Subjectivity
82
Wrights The Outsider and French Existentialism
101
Pagan Spain Wrights Discourse on Religion and Culture
120
The African Primal Outlook upon Life Wright and Morrison
139
The Poetics of Nature Wrights Haiku Zen and Lacan
153
Private Voice and Buddhist Enlightenment in Alice Walkers The Color Purple
170
CrossCultural Poetics Sonia Sanchezs Like the Singing Coming Off the Drums
180
James Emanuels Jazz Haiku and African American Individualism
195
Notes
219
Works Cited
235
Index
243
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Über den Autor (2006)

Yoshinobu Hakutani is professor of English and University Distinguished Scholar at Kent State University. He is the author or editor of many books, including "Cross-Cultural Visions in African American Modernism, Theodore Dreiser's Uncollected Magazine Articles, Theodore Dreiser and American Culture, Selected Magazine Articles of Theodore Dreiser, "and "Young Dreiser.

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