The Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, Band 61

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publisher not identified, 1844
 

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Seite 199 - OWEN. - LECTURES ON THE COMPARATIVE ANATOMY and PHYSIOLOGY of the INVERTEBRATE ANIMALS, delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons in 1843. By RICHARD OWEN, FRS Hunterian Professor to the College. From Notes taken by William White Cooper, MRCS and revised by Professor Owen. With Glossary and Index.
Seite 30 - OF OUR KNOWLEDGE OF INFLAMMATION. " Inflammation is so interwoven with the theory and practice of medicine . . . that in all ages it has been made the pivot upon which the medical philosophy of the time has revolved." — JH BENNETT, Treatise on Inflammation. MICROSCOPICAL inquiry has had the most important influence on the development of our knowledge of inflammation. Every step in the former department has advanced the latter, and each error there has made itself felt here. But beyond everything...
Seite 45 - If the acid be weak, the capillary contraction occurs more slowly and gradually. If it be very concentrated, the phenomenon is not observed, or it passes so quickly into complete stoppage of blood, as to be imperceptible. Although we cannot see these changes in man under the microscope, certain appearances indicate that the same phenomena occur. The operations of the mind, for instance, as fear and fright, and the application of cold, produce paleness of the skin ; an effect which can only arise...
Seite 152 - The use of this medicine seems chiefly applicable to the sthenic form of gout, which occurs in robust constitutions, and in the prime of life; but it is almost inadmissible in persons advanced in years, who have had several attacks, and in whom the malady would seem too deeply rooted to be influenced by the temporary administration of this remedy.
Seite 441 - Liebig have shown to contain a preponderance of this acid. Hence these products abound during great muscular exertion ; and when perspiration is checked by external cold they may be retained in the blood, causing rheumatism, urinary disorders, or various cutaneous diseases. The very serious effects sometimes resulting from sudden cold on the perspiring body may be partly owing to the same cause, as well as to the disorder produced in the circulation. Rheumatism is especially liable to occur as an...
Seite 55 - when liquor sanguinis is exuded it generally coagulates and constitutes a foreign body in the texture of the parts affected, which it becomes the object of nature to remove from the system, or so to modify that its presence may be rendered conducive to the wants of the economy. In order to accomplish this two kinds of changes may take place, — 1st, the exudation serves as a blastema in which new vital structures originate and are developed ; 2nd, it exhibits no power of becoming organized, and...
Seite 151 - Colchicum should not be given in the asthenic form of gout. " 2. Colchicum should never be given at the onset of a paroxysm, nor until the bowels have been duly acted upon by mild purgatives. " 3. The first doses of the medicine should be very small ; they may be gradually increased.
Seite 39 - If this deposit is examined under the microscope, it will be found to be made up of small masses of pigment, concerning whose nature or origin nothing is known.
Seite 295 - Cullerier prefers using mercury by friction in primary sores ; he orders from a quarter of a drachm to a drachm and a half of mercurial ointment at each friction, leaving an interval between them of one, two, or three days, with the view of not irritating either the sore or the constitution, by bringing the latter suddenly under the influence of the remedy. Ricord frequently orders the frictions to the...
Seite 296 - The combination of antimony and mercury has always appeared to him to render the influence of the latter more manageable, as well as more certain, while the addition of opium diminishes the irritating influence of mercury on the bowels, and subdues the disposition to an irritable state of the general system, or of the local disease. During its administration we must also carefully...

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