Modern Love: Personal Relationships in Twentieth-century Britain

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University of Delaware Press, 2006 - 294 Seiten
Private life has altered beyond all recognition during the past one hundred years. Britain in 1900 was emerging from a Victorian era in which prudery, patriarchal authority, and pettifogging rules of etiquette were widely perceived to have circumscribed relations between men and women. The twentieth century witnessed a reaction against this system of separate spheres spearheaded by reformers eager that the sexes become each other's equals and intimates. Modern Love traces the trajectory of this new model of personal relationships over the course of the twentieth century, from its emergence out of the crucible of the suffrage campaign through its reshaping by the women's liberation movement. It explores its impact on smut merchants, warring couples, and teenagers, as well as its reception by such diverse figures as Bertrand Russell and Germaine Greer. It draws on sources as varied as suffragette propaganda, banned sex manuals, marriage counseling literature and pin-up magazines. Marcus Collins teaches modern British history at Emory University.
 

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Inhalt

Common Cause The Solution to Sex Antagonism c 18901918
13
The Great Experiment Mutualists and Malcontents c 191845
39
MUTUALITY TESTED
57
All Mixed Up Boys Girls and Youth Clubs
59
Marriage for Moderns Problems of Patriarchy and Companionship
90
Porn Free Mens Sexuality and Womens Emancipation
134
MUTUALITY ECLIPSED
165
Fallout The Challenge of SecondWave Feminism c 194590
167
Alone Together c 19902000
206
Notes
220
Index
281
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 17 - We are foolish, and without excuse foolish, in speaking of the " superiority " of one sex to the other, as if they could be compared in similar things. Each has what the other has not : each completes the other, and is completed by the other : they are in nothing alike, and the happiness and perfection of both depends on each asking and receiving from the other what the other only can give.

Über den Autor (2006)

Marcus Collins is Assistant Professor of History at Emory University.

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