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Sa 120.20

mare, ib. 2935

By exchange

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1834,

By ALLEN AND TICKNOR,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.

LYCEUM PRESS-GEO. W. LIGHT.

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319

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Astronomy-the Moon,

5 Distinction,

227

Animal Mechanism,

69 Depth of the Oce

382

Admitting Ladies to Lyceums,

Dogs, .

387

Animal and Vegetable Life,

Diffusion of Know

387

An Opinion of De Witt Clinton, . Exotic Serpents, .
Ancient Grave-stone, .

Egyptian Animals,

192
Alligator and Crocodil

Etruscan Antiquities,

227
Antiquities, .

Entomology,

252
Asiatic Sheep,
. 193 Extraordinary Power of Memory, 319

324
Atomic Construction of Matter, . 215 | Egyptian Antiqui
Advantages of an Education, 226 Evaporation,

: :

227 Fossil Shells,

Architectural Monuments of

: 90, 256

Animated Beings, .

256 First notice of the Mastodon,

American Plants, .

285 First Botanic Garden in the

Antiquarian,

Frogs, . . .

Agricultural Waste, . . . 287 Fossil Teeth, .

Antiques,

287 Fossil Reptiles,

Ancient American City, , 290 Facial Angle, .

Antiquities of Bamiyan,

308 Fossil Fishes,

194

Antiquity of the Bagpipe,

First Food of 'Young Fishes, 250

Atmospheric pressure, ..
386 Fashionable Ears,

260
Ancient Architects,

288
.

386 Fossil Saurian Reptiles,
Birds, .

307
.

31 Fruit Trees, .
Barking Dogs,

35 | Fire King, .
Boston Wesleyan Lyceum, . . 64 Fire of Baku, . .
Buffalo,

Governor Hunter, .
Boston 'Hibernian Lyceum, :

Gypsum,

127

Brilliant Scintillating

255 Good's Book of Natur

. 160

Bourrienne, .

195

.

286 Gray Parrot, .

Battering Ram,

Gresham College

• 226

Boston Infant School

Green Monkey

Burials in Havana,

352 Great Musical Fes

286

Barometer, .

355 | Gresham Institution, ..

Banana, ..

356 Galvanism, ..

Blown Lenses,

. 381

354

Bacchanalia,

Gunpowder, . .

383

Barbarity of

384

Gastric Juice,

Banian Tree,

386 History of Volcanoes, .

Colonizationist,

Hieroglyphics, .

Curious Anecdote of a Toad,

| Hitchcock's Report,

Compliment from Mr. Pitt,

Hearts of Oysters,

Caoutchouc,

101 Hunting Leopard, .

Chemistry,

162 Height of Mountains,

Chimney Swallows, . .

. 194

| Head of Venus, ..

Clay for Food,

Improvements in the Arts,

Civil Architecture,

Indigenous Animals, .

City in the Moon,

255 Ingenuity of a Spider, .

Chimpanse, .

258 Infant Schools,

Cold, . . . . .

258 Immensity of the Universe, .

Civet, .

259 Improvement in Stables,

Climate,

286 Ingenious Method of Writin

Coffee, .

288 Idea of Distance, . . . 254

Conversazione,

290 Inquisition,

385

Crooked Guns, .

291 Javanese Bat,

Causes of the Prosperit

304 Jupiter,

324

Characteristic Fashions,

321 Letters to the Editor, . . 56, 213

Chinese Language,

323 Lectures on Practical E

Concord Lyceum,

349 Libraries in France,

Colonization Socie

370 Late Scientific Works in England

Cause of Fevers, .

375 Luminous Appearance of the Sea,

Chinese Economy in Fishing, 377 Letters from the Canary Islands, 312

Curious Trees and Plants,

5 Latin Works,

320

322

Drawings, .

29 Locusts,

Discovery, . . . . . 163 Letter from Batavia,

365

. . .

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Myology of Gengis Khan, ·

131
: 103 Royai kable Tiesis,

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121

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193

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Light, · · ·

386 | Royal Colleges,

·

· · ·

195

·
Malay,...

Rings of Saturn,

. 254
Memorial to Congress,
. 92 Rational Analysis,

274
Remarkable Trees,

286
Monument of

. 163 Royal Observatory of Oude, i 291
Mortality of Monkeys,

Royal Society of Edinburg, .

291
Music, . .

321
.

Rat-catching,
Mammoth Lens, .

Raphael, .

323
Musket Ball in a Man's Brai 256 Royal Society,

354
Monument to Philosophers, . 257 Roman Coins,
Moulding and Casting in Plaster, 261 Roman Bakers,
Malt, .. .
288

: 385
Royal Society of Literature,
.. .

Musical Kite,

289 Rivers, ..

387

Magpie,

290 Scientific Doings,' 33, 63, 93, 123,

160

Marylebone Institution, .

190, 225, 253

Milky Way, .

321 Scientific and Literary Notices,

Mental Culture,

School Apparatus,

Mechanics in the

323 Somnambulist, .

Mosaic, . .

324 Sand at Sea, .

. 160

.

Mariner's Compass, .

355 Skeletons of Birds,

163

Mixed Blood of Americans,

Siberian Elephant,

183
Mammoths, . .

Sprats, .

191
Novel Machinery,

Small Hands and Feet,
Notices of New Books,

Specimens in Natural Histo
New Hydrometer,

Sketch of the Indians, .
Native Mammoth of New York,

Sir John Herschel,

226
New Books, ...

Splendid Gift,

227
New Work, . .

Sound, .

256
Native Dyes,

Sympathy, . . .

260

Name of a Mummy,

Stars, . : ...

320

New Medical School,

Strength of Human Muscles, 322
New Substance discovered in Opium, 289 Swimming Child, . .

356

New Metal,

290 Subjects of Inqu

New Species of Chamæleon, : 291 Sacrifice of Human Life, . 384

Nauscopy, .

St. Mark, ..

386

Ornithology, ..

Six Fingers, .

Optical Apparatus, .

99 The Turkey, ..

29

Original Stock of Domestic Cat tle, 192 Tracts and Lyceum, .

Two Native Races in Madagascar,

: 380 Telegraphic Language, 81, 114, 148

Public Lectures,

The Vulture,

Perpetual Motion

Transportation of Perio
Phrenology, .

The Multiplication of Fishes

Perkinism Revive

110 To the Editor, 61, 62, 178, 214,

Prussia-its Position and Des

| Transmission of Sound

192

Plan of an African Ant Hill,

Tobacco-pipe Fish,

221

Pelicans, . .

191

227

Turkish Dictionary,

Popular Botany, 217, 245, 280, 338 | Tyrian Purple, • . . .

253

Protection for the Eyes of Birds, 225 Tench, .

Paper from Rotten Wood,

226 Tabula Philologica, : : : 287

Titles, .

290

Population of the

253 The Royal Societ

379

Plants,

| Temple of Belus,

Poisonous Fis

257 The Sun,.. .

Puff-ball,

258 To Correspondents,

164

Philippine Weaver, .

259

196, 228, 260, 292, 324, 356, 388

Peculiar Growth of Human Hair, 259 University of Berlin,

Prizes, . .

28

. . .

291 | Venomous Character of Spiders,

.
Phillip Baratier, .

323 Vocal Organs of Birds,

Popular Whims and Superstiti

| Valuable Discovery,

Period of Incubation of Eggs, : 356 Water Power, .
Quadrature of the Circle,

Whippoorwill,
Red Haired Mulatto, .

White Elephants,

190
Rain Water,

Wheat Insect,

220

heat insect. . . .

Remark,

. : 127 Whispering Tunnel, : : 255

Rare Medals,

. . 163 | Wolverene, . .'

257

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AND

FAMILY LYCEUM.

JANUARY 1, 1834.

[Furnished for the Scientific Tracts and Family Lyceum.]

ASTRONOMY.

THE MOON. AFTER the sun, the moon is the most prominent and interesting object visible in the heavens. The theory of the moon's motions, as well as its place in the heavens at particular times, is of great importance in navigation ; for by means of these, seamen ascertain the longitude of their vessels, and thus find how far east or west they are of their .port of destination. The great improvements which have been made in Nautical Astronomy in modern times, have been mainly produced by the assiduous exertions of learned men to discover the true theory of the moon's motions ; added to this, if we consider the vast influence which the old notions respecting the heavenly bodies, particularly that of the moon, have had upon the happiness of mankind, we cannot but acknowledge the importance of correct notions in relation to this subject among the great mass of the people. If to all this, we add the vast influence exercised by old prejudices and superstitions in relation to the influence of the moon on the local affairs of our planet and its inhabitants, even at the present time, we cannot but think some good may be done by devoting a few tracts to an explanation of some of the most obvious and important facts in relation to this subject. We propose to explain in a brief and practical manner, the cause of some of the most obvious appearances of the moon, together with the general laws which govern her motions. We shall be

careful that our facts, when assumed, are drawn from authentic sources, and that our reasoning is such as may be understood and followed by common people.

APPEARANCE AND CONSTITUTION OF THE Moon.

When the moon is viewed with the naked eye, several dark spots are observed, which are occasioned by the moon's surface being broken into irregular portions. When we look at the surface of the moon with a good telescope, we find its surface wonderfully broken and diversified Besides the dark spots which are visible to the naked eye, extensive valleys and long ridges of mountains are readily distinguished, projecting their shadows on the plains below. Single mountains are here and there seen, which rise to a considerable height. We may know that we truly behold mountains and valleys in the moon, by the simple consideration, that we behold and may trace the outlines of the shadows cast by the hills and mountains ; and these are found to be in exact proportion to the lengths which they should have, knowing the inclination with which the sun's rays strike that part of the moon's surface. From the most accurate measurements of the heights of the lunar mountains, none of them are found to exceed two miles. There are also observed upon the moon's surface deep and accurately defined cavities or valleys. The mountains and hollows are all of one similar shape, being nearly all circular ; the hollows having flat bottoms, and in most cases a small steep conical hill or mountain is seen directly in the middle of these valleys; thus presenting an exact resemblance of volcanoes, such as are found upon our planet ; in point of fact, Dr. Herschel in 1787, saw three volcanoes in different parts of the new moon, two of them in an active state of eruption, sending forth fames. The next night after he first saw them, he observed them again still in flames.

When the moon is full, or in opposition, the elevations and depressions on her surface nearly disappear, because then the sun shines directly upon her surface, and, of

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