Mental Science: A Compendium of Psychology, and the History of Philosophy, Designed as a Text-book for High-schools and Colleges

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D. Appleton, 1868 - 537 Seiten
 

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Sensations of Tasto
37
Relishes and Disgusts ib 6 Tastes involving Touch Saline Alkaline Sour Astringent
38
Smell related to the Lungs
39
gaseous or volatile bodies ib 3 Derelopment of odours by heat light and moisturo ib 4 Diffusion of odours
40
in sympathy with the lungs are Fresh and Close odours
41
Fragrant odours and the opposite ib 9 Odours involving tactile sensibility Pungency
42
EENBE OF TOUCII 1 Touch an intellectual Sense The Objects solid bodies
43
Emotional Soft Touch Pungent Touch Tempera ib ture Tickling and acute pains 5 Intellectual Sensations Plurality of PointsWebers experi ments Pre...
45
Hardness and Softness Roughness and Smoothness Exten sion or the Coexisting in Space
47
SENSE OF HEARING 1 Objects of IIearingmaterial bodies in a stato of tremor
51
The Ear ib 3 The mode of action in hearing
52
Pitch Waxing and Waning flarmony and Discord
54
Clearness I imbre Articulate sounds Distance and Direction
55
SESSE OF SIGHT 1 Objects of Sight
56
Mode of action in the first place an optical effect
59
Binocular Vision Seeing objects erect by an inverted image
60
Light Colour Lustre ib 6 Sensations involving the Movements of the Eyo Visible Move Dient Visible Form Apparent Size Distance Volume Visible S...
62
THE APPETITES
67
Muscles of the Body generally
73
Law of Selfconservation
79
SENSATION
101
ASSOCIATIONS OF TOLITION
109
The complex current of each ones existence
124
SIMILARITY IN DIVERSITYSENSATIONS
130
Sight Colours Forms and their combinations
136
I Definition
143
Figures of Similitudo abound in all grcat works of literary
149
APPENDIX
181
Energy as opposed to Passive Feeling 5 11 Uniform connexion of Definite Feelings with Definite
198
BOOK III
215
Feeling in general defined ib 3 Twofold aspect of FeelingPhysical and Mental
216
CHARACTERS OF FEELING 6 The Characters of Feeling fall under four classes
217
Quality Pleasure and Pain Degree Speciality ib Volitional characters of Fecling 9 The voluntary actions a clue to the Feelings
218
The Ideal persistence of feelings extends their sphero ib Mixed characters of Feeling 11 Will combined with Ideal persistence makes Forethought
219
The influence in Belief is a mixed character
220
TIIE INTERPRETATION AND ESTIMATE OF FEELING 15 1 The Expression indicates the feelings of others
221
2 The Conduct pursued indicates pleasure and pain ib 17 3 The Course of the Thoughts bears the impress of the Feelings
222
Sympathy cannot subsist upon extreme selfabnegation
282
Light
296
its definition Human energy Inavimate
302
The causes of Laughter
315
A link has to be formed between actions and feelings
322
Second stage the uniting of movements with Intermediate Ends
332
CONTROL OF FEELINGS AND THOUGIITS
338
Command of the Thoughts a means of controlling the Feelings 311
345
The Will biased by Fixed Ideas
351
CHAP V
365
Avarice Ambition
370
Belief in the order of the World varies with the three elements
382
THE CONFLICT OF MOTIVES
386
Invigoration
391
The perplexity of the question is owing to the inaptness of
398
Meanings of Choice Deliberation Selfdetermination Moral
405
DESCARTES We are conscious of Freedom Liberty is
412
PRICE Took up Clarkes view of selfmotion
420
Muscular Feelings compared with Sensations The muscular
1
Pain of Chillness Pleasure of transition to warmth
7
HOPE and DESPONDENCY are phases of Belief
10
ARISTOTLE Enters his protest against separating Universals from
23
HUME Abstract ideas are in themselves individual
29
BROWN A general word designates certain particulars together
30
THE SCHOOLMEN Opposing views were held The question
45
Oral Language involves the Voice and the
49
ARNAULD Distinguishes between Image and Idea There
51
Short methods of acquiring language
55
KANT His position as between the opposing schools Maintained
58
Supposed faculty of SelfConsciousness
61
BUFFIER His anticipation of Reid Defines Common Sense
62
Events narrated have the aid of the Verbal ſiemory
67
HAMILTON Common Sense another name for the final appeal
68
Enumeration of primary Pleasurc3 and Pains Important distinc
78
il
84
THE INTELLECTUAL POWERS Aquinas Reid Stewart Brown
88
SENSATION Expresses various contrasting phenomena
94

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Seite 207 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
Seite 28 - ... consider some particular parts or qualities separated from others, with which, though they are united in some object, yet it is possible they may really exist without them. But I deny that I can abstract...
Seite 28 - I find indeed I have a faculty of imagining, or representing to myself the ideas of those particular things I have perceived and of variously compounding and dividing them. I can imagine a man with two heads or the upper parts of a man joined to the body of a horse. I can consider the hand, the eye, the nose, each by itself abstracted or separated from the rest of the body. But then whatever hand or eye I imagine, it must have some particular shape and colour.
Seite 29 - A great philosopher has disputed the received opinion in this particular ; and has asserted that all general ideas are nothing but particular ones annexed to a certain term, which gives them a more extensive signification, and makes them recall, upon occasion, other individuals which are similar to them. As I look upon this to be one of the greatest and most valuable discoveries that have been made of late years in the republic of letters...
Seite 316 - The passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Seite 413 - Volition, it is plain, is an act of the mind knowingly exerting that dominion it takes itself to have over any part of the man, by employing it in, or withholding it from any particular action.
Seite 96 - I think, is a thinking intelligent being, that has reason and reflection, and can consider itself as itself, the same thinking thing, in different times and places...
Seite 306 - Apollo; but in that form which is taken from all, and which partakes equally of the activity of the Gladiator, of the delicacy of the Apollo, and of the muscular strength of the Hercules. (For perfect beauty in any species must combine all the characters which are beautiful in that species. It cannot consist in any one to the exclusion of the rest : no one, therefore, must be predominant, that no one may be deficient.
Seite 210 - Along with whatever any Intelligence knows it must, as the ground or condition of its knowledge, have some cognisance of itself.
Seite 64 - There is a certain regard due to human testimony in matters of fact, and even to human authority in matters of opinion.

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