Among the Great Masters of Literature: Scenes in the Lives of Great Authors

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D. Estes, 1900 - 225 Seiten

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Seite 17 - Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No: — Men, high-minded men, With powers as far above dull brutes endued In forest, brake, or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude — Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain. Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain : — These constitute a State ; And sovereign Law, that State's collected will, O'er thrones and globes elate, Sits empress, crowning good, repressing...
Seite 95 - CROMWELL, our chief of men, who through a cloud Not of war only, but detractions rude, Guided by faith and matchless fortitude, To peace and truth thy glorious way hast ploughed...
Seite 154 - When upon some slight encouragement I first visited your Lordship, I was overpowered like the rest of mankind by the enchantment of your address, and could not forbear to wish that I might boast myself le vainqueur du vainqueur de la terre...
Seite 155 - I waited in your outward rooms, or was repulsed from your door ; during which time I have been pushing on my work through difficulties, of which it is useless to complain, and have brought it, at last, to the verge of publication, without one act of assistance,* one word of encouragement, or one smile of favour. Such treatment I did not expect, for I never had a Patron before. " The shepherd in Virgil grew at last acquainted with Love, and found him a native of the rocks.
Seite 154 - My Lord, I have been lately informed, by the proprietor of The World, that two papers, in which my Dictionary is recommended to the public, were written by your Lordship.
Seite 163 - I received one morning a message from poor Goldsmith that he was in great distress, and as it was not in his power to come to me, begging that I would come to him as soon as possible. I sent him a guinea, and promised to come to him directly. I accordingly went as soon as I was dressed, and found that his landlady had arrested him for his rent, at which he was in a violent passion. I perceived that he had already changed my guinea, and had got a bottle of Madeira and a glass before him. I put the...
Seite 81 - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid! Heard words that have been So nimble and so full of subtle flame As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life.
Seite 156 - Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any favourer of learning', I shall not be disappointed though I should conclude it, if less be possible, with less ; for I have been long wakened from that dream of hope, in which I once boasted myself with so much exultation, 'My Lord, ' Your Lordship's most humble, ' Most obedient servant,
Seite 155 - Seven years, My Lord, have now passed since I waited in your outward rooms or was repulsed from your door, during which time I have been pushing on my work through difficulties of which it is useless to complain, and have brought it at last to the verge of publication without one act of assistance, one word of encouragement or one smile of favour.
Seite 150 - My love is dead, Gone to his death-bed All under the willow-tree. Hark! the raven flaps his wing In the brier'd dell below; Hark! the death-owl loud doth sing To the nightmares, as they go: My love is dead, Gone to his death-bed All under the willow-tree.

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