Why Four Gospels: The Historical Origins of the Gospels

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Energion Publications, 09.05.2016 - 122 Seiten
1 Rezension

 In Why Four Gospels? noted Greek and New Testament scholar David Alan Black, concisely and clearly presents the case for the early development of the gospels, beginning with Matthew, rather than Mark. But this is much more than a discussion of the order in which the gospels were written. Using both internal data from the gospels themselves and an exhaustive and careful examination of the statements of the early church fathers, Dr. Black places each gospel in the context of the development of the early church.

Though Markan priority is the dominant position still in Biblical scholarship, Dr. Black argues that this position is not based on the best evidence available, that the internal evidence is often given more weight than it deserves and alternative explanations are dismissed or ignored. If you would like an outline of the basis for accepting both early authorship of the gospels and the priority of Matthew, this book is for you.

 

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - DubiousDisciple - LibraryThing

Very good. This is a concise, well-organized explanation of the historical and textual arguments for David Black’s Fourfold-Gospel Hypothesis and an early writing of the Gospels. It’s a conservative ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

The Gentile Mission Phase
7
The Origins of the Gospels
21
The Credibility of the FourfoldGospel Hypothesis
43
The Markan Synthesis
66
Bibliography
79
Index
101
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Über den Autor (2016)

David Alan Black holds a doctorate in theology from the University of Basel in Switzerland and has taught New Testament and Greek for over 30 years. He is also the editor of the popular website, Dave Black Online. He has published over 20 books, including The Myth of Adolescence, Interpreting the New Testament, It's Still Greek to Me, and The Jesus Paradigm. He and his wife live on a 123-acre working farm in southern Virginia and are self-supporting missionaries to Ethiopia, which they visit twice each year.

 

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