The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Tragedy

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Claire McEachern
Cambridge University Press, 2002 - 274 Seiten
The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Tragedy acquaints the student reader with the forms, contexts, critical and theatrical lives of the ten plays considered to be Shakespeare's tragedies. Shakespearean tragedy is a highly complex and demanding theatre genre, but the thirteen essays, written by leading scholars in Britain and North America, are clear, concise and informative. They address the ways in which Shakespearean tragedy originated, developed and diversified, as well as how it has fared on stage, as text and in criticism. Topics covered include the literary precursors of Shakespearean tragedies (medieval, classical, and contemporary), cultural backgrounds (political, religious, social, and psychological), and the subgenres of Shakespeare's tragedy (love tragedy, revenge tragedy, and classical tragedy), as well as the critical and theatrical receptions of the plays. The book examines the four major tragedies and, in addition, Titus Andronicus, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus and Timon of Athens.
 

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Inhalt

What is a Shakespearean tragedy?
1
The language of tragedy
23
Tragedy in Shakespeares career
50
Shakespearean tragedy printed and performed
69
Religion and Shakespearean tragedy
86
Tragedy and political authority
103
Gender and family
123
The tragic subject and its passions
142
Tragedies of revenge and ambition
160
Shakespeares tragedies of love
182
Shakespeares classical tragedies
204
The critical reception of Shakespeares tragedies
224
Antony and Cleopatra in the theatre
241
Select bibliography
264
Index
272
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Über den Autor (2002)

Claire McEachern is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of The Poetics of English Nationhood, 1512-1612 (Cambridge 1996), and co-editor (with Debora Shuger) of Religion and Culture in the English Renaissance (Cambridge, 1997).

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