The Social Context of Cognitive Development

Cover
Guilford Press, 01.01.2001 - 249 Seiten
Traditional approaches to cognitive development can tell us a great deal about the internal processes involved in learning. Sociocultural perspectives, on the other hand, provide valuable insights into the influences on learning of relationship and cultural variables. This volume provides a much-needed bridge between these disparate bodies of research, examining the specific processes through which children internalize the lessons learned in social contexts. The book reviews current findings on four specific domains of cognitive development--attention, memory, problem solving, and planning. The course of intellectual growth in each domain is described, and social factors that support or constrain it are identified. The focus throughout is on how family, peer, and community factors influence not only what a child learns, but also how learning occurs. Supporting her arguments with solid empirical data, the author convincingly shows how attention to sociocultural factors can productively complement more traditional avenues of investigation.
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

Introduction
3
THE SOCIAL FOUNDATION OF THE MIND
5
REMEMBERING CHILDHOOD
8
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
17
Processes of Change The How of Cognitive Development
19
WHAT ARE THE MECHANISMS OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT?
20
WHAT EXTERNAL FACTORS HAVE BEEN IMPLICATED AS MECHANISMS OF COGNITIVE CHANGE?
24
SOCIAL PROCESSES AS MECHANISMS OF INTELLECTUAL GROWTH
30
Remembering The Social Construction of the Past
102
WHAT IS MEMORY AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
104
EARLY EVIDENCE OF REMEMBERING
106
THE SOCIAL CONTEXT OF MEMORY DEVELOPMENT
109
SOCIAL INFLUENCES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF EVENT AND STRATEGIC MEMORY
114
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
136
Solving and Learning to Solve Problems in Social Context
137
WHAT IS PROBLEM SOLVING?
139

SOCIAL PROCESSES OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
34
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
40
The Sociocultural Context of Cognitive Development
43
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN CULTURAL CONTEXT
44
IDENTIFYING THE ORIGINS OF HIGHER MENTAL FUNCTIONS IN SOCIAL ACTIVITY
47
WHOS INVOLVED?
55
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
62
THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFIC HIGHER MENTAL FUNCTIONS IN SOCIAL CONTEXT
65
Acquiring Knowledge Intersubjectivity Joint Attention and Social Referencing
67
ATTENTION AND ITS DEVELOPMENT
71
SOCIAL EXPERIENCE AND EARLY ATTENTIONAL PROCESSES
77
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
101
SOCIAL INTERACTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROBLEM SOLVING
140
THE SOCIAL CONTEXT OF PROBLEM SOLVING INTERACTION
163
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
169
Constructing the Future Planning in Social Context
172
PLANNING AND ITS DEVELOPMENT OVER CHILDHOOD
174
SOCIAL INTERACTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF PLANNING
177
SOCIAL PROCESSES THAT REGULATE CHILDRENS OPPORTUNITIES TO LEARN ABOUT PLANNING FROM EXPERIENCE WITH OTHERS
198
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS
205
Conclusions and Future Directions
207
References
217
Index
239
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 225 - RADER, N. 1979. Attention: the perceiver as performer. In GA Hale & M. Lewis, eds., Attention and cognitive development. New York: Plenum.
Seite 227 - BE (1982). Sustained attention during exploratory manipulation as a predictor of cognitive competence in preterm infants. Child Development, 53, 174-182.

Über den Autor (2001)

Mary Gauvain, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at the University of California at Riverside. She received her master's degree in Sociology of Education from Stanford University and her doctoral degree in Developmental Psychology from the University of Utah. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and has served on the Executive Committee of the APA Division of Developmental Psychology. She is also a member of the Society for Research in Child Development. Her research on children's cognitive development in social and cultural contexts is widely published and has been funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and The Spencer Foundation, among others.

Bibliografische Informationen