The British tourists: or, Traveller's pocket companion, through England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. Comprehending the most celebrated tours in the British Islands, Band 1

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Printed for Richard Phillips, 1809
 

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Seite 153 - The mind can hardly form an idea more magnificent than such a space, supported on each side by ranges of columns, and roofed by the bottoms of those which have been broken off in order to form it, between the angles of which a yellow stalagmitic matter has exuded, which serves to define the angles precisely, and at the same time vary the colour with a great deal of elegance ; and to render it still more agreeable, the whole is lighted from without...
Seite 152 - Compared to this what are the cathedrals or the palaces built by men! mere models or playthings, imitations as diminutive as his works will always be when compared to those of nature. Where is now the boast of the architect! regularity the only part in which he fancied himself to exceed his mistress, Nature, is here found in her possession, and here it has been for ages undescribed.
Seite 37 - The rites begin with spilling some of the caudle on the ground, by way of libation: on that, every one takes a cake of oatmeal, upon which are raised nine square knobs, each dedicated to some particular being, the supposed preserver of their flocks...
Seite 153 - ... in order to form it , between the angles of which a yellow stalagmitic matter has exuded, which serves to define the angles precisely, and at the same time vary the colour with a great deal of elegance ; and to render it still more agreeable, the whole is lighted from without, so that the farthest extremity is very plainly seen from without, and the air within being agitated by the flux and reflux of the tides, is perfectly dry and wholesome, free entirely from the damp vapours with which natural...
Seite 152 - ... part of the island, the seat of the most remarkable pillars, where we no sooner arrived than we were struck with a scene of magnificence which exceeded our expectations, though formed as we thought upon the most sanguine foundations...
Seite 152 - ... feet high, standing in natural colonnades, according as the bays or points of land formed themselves: upon a firm basis of solid unformed rock, above these, the stratum which reaches to the soil or surface of the island, varied in thickness, as the island itself formed into hills or...
Seite 15 - Oft listening tearful when the wild winds beat, With hollow bodings round your ancient walls ; And Pity, at the dark and stormy hour Of Midnight, when the moon is hid on high, Keeps her lone watch upon the topmost tow'r, And turns her ear to each expiring cry ; Blest if her aid some fainting Wretch might save, And snatch him cold and speechless from the wave.
Seite 15 - Here charity hath fix'd her chosen seat, Oft listening tearful when the wild winds beat, With hollow bodings round your ancient walls; And pity, at the dark and stormy hour Of midnight, when the moon is hid on high, Keeps her lone watch...
Seite 148 - They are called clacha-brath, for it is thought that the brath, or end of the world, will not arrive till the stone on which they stand is worn through.
Seite 271 - I have been bullied by an usurper, I have been neglected by a court, but I will not be dictated to by a subject ; your man shan't stand. " ANNE, DORSET, PEMBRoKE,

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