Harper's First [-sixth] Reader, Bücher 4

Cover
Orville T. Bright, James Baldwin
American Book Company, 1888
 

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Inhalt

A Sailors Song of the Sea Barry Cornwall
31
Riding a Camel Thomas W Knox
32
The First Discovery of America P H Mallet
35
The Magic Mill A Fairy Tale 89
39
The New Life Jane Andrews Adapted
41
Freaks of the Frost Hannah F Gould
46
The Man who Believed that the Earth is Round I C C Coffin
47
The Bravest Man in the Regiment David Ker
53
The Nests of Birds
57
Little Jerry the Miller John G Saxe
62
An Arab Schoolboy
64
The First Voyage of Columbus C C Coffin
67
The Miser A Russian Fable Ivan Krllof
71
Why the Water of the Sea is Salty
74
A Wish Rose Terry
77
Selfishness A Story of Germany
78
The Last Voyages of Columbus C C Coffin
82
Forty Years Ago
85
The Scullion who Became a Sculptor Geo Cary Eggleston
87
How the Pacific Ocean was Discovered C C Coffin
91
John Maynard the Pilot J B Gough
96
The Gorilla P B Du Chaillu
98
The Old Oaken Bucket Samuel Woodworth
101
Captain John Smith I John Esten Cooke
103
Captain John Smith II 106
106
About the Sun
110
Birds in Summer Mary Howiti
114
LESSON ADAPTED FROM PAGE 37 A Visit to the Sultan of Borneo Lieut E W Sturdy
116
More about Captain John Smith I John Esten Cooke
120
More about Captain John Smith II 123
123
The Planets
127
The Voice of Spring Felicia Hemans
130
A Brave Little Rebel I Mary Densel
131
A Brave Little Rebel II 133
133
A Brave Little Rebel Ill 137
137
Song of Marions Men W C Bryant
139
Bread and Yeast
141
The Lighthonse of Inverkaldy
144
Sponges
148
My First Day in Philadelphia Benjamin Franklin
150
The Eagle and the Swan J J Audubon
152
The Fairies of Caldon Low Mary Howitt
154
The Lost Child A Story of Australia I Henry Kingsley
157
The Lost Child A Story of Australia II
161
What was in the Teakettle 1
164
What was in the Teakettle II
166
The Pilgrims I C C Coffin
170
The Pilgrims II 174
174
The Landing of the Pilgrims Felicia Hemans
177
A Bridge of Monkeys Mayne Reid
179
George Washington the Young Surveyor II
215
Steam Worthington Hooker
222
The Schoolmaster and the Sick Scholar II
225
The Child Musician Andrew Lang
228
The Captives C C Coffin
229
The Better Land Felicia Hemans
233
Mount Vesuvius Charles Kingsley
234
Washington in the Wilderness I John Esten Cooke
239
LESSON ADAPTED FROM PAGE 17 Washington in the Wilderness II John Esten Cooke
242
How Thor Went to the Land of Jotunheim A Norse Myth
246
The Slaughter of the Birds IK C Gannett
250
The Feast of Cherries
252
A Strange Animal A Buckley
255
Thor and Skrymer 4 Norse Myth
258
The Reaper and the Flowers II V Longfellow
262
The Wolf 203
263
The Boston Teaparty George Bancroft
266
The Work of the Waves and Tides
270
How Thors Boasting Came to Naught A None Myth
273
Four Sunbeams
278
Do Animals Think? Worthington Hooker
280
The Story of a Brave Girl I John Esten Cooke
284
The Story of a Brave Girl IL 288
288
The Power of the Sunbeams A Buckley
291
Little Gretchen From the German
295
Life on the Plains 1
299
Life on the Plains II
302
Peter the Great
306
The Mariners Dream William Dimond
309
Marco Polo
311
What the Waves were Always Saying Charles Dickens
315
Seven Times Two Jean Ingelow
320
Crocodiles and Alligators
322
A Legend of Bregenz Adelaide Procter
325
The King of the Golden River I John Buskin
330
The King of the Golden River II 333
333
The King of the Golden River III
338
From Shore to Shore
342
The Chieftainess and the Volcano CM Yonge
344
The Three Hundred Spartans 1
347
The Three Hundred Spartans II
350
The Brook Alfred Tennyson
352
The Oasis 1
354
The Oasis II
358
Books John Buskin
361
Pieces to be Memorized 365372
365
For Reference and Study Principles of Good Reading
373
Notes for the Use of Teachers and Pupils
377
Words Used in the Fourth Reader
387

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 368 - My fairest child, I have no song to give you ; No lark could pipe to skies so dull and gray : Yet, ere we part, one lesson I can leave you For every day. Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever ; Do noble things, not dream them, all day long : And so make life, death, and that vast for-ever One grand, sweet song.
Seite 182 - Workmen wrought thy ribs of steel, Who made each mast, and sail, and rope, What anvils rang, what hammers beat, In what a forge and what a heat Were shaped the anchors of thy hope.
Seite 140 - We know the forest round us, As seamen know the sea; We know its walls of thorny vines. Its glades of reedy grass, Its safe and silent islands Within the dark morass. Woe to the English soldiery That little dread us near! On them shall light at midnight A strange and sudden fear; . When, waking to their tents on fire They grasp their arms in vain, And they who stand to face us Are beat to earth again...
Seite 366 - Now we are engaged in a great civil war testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live.
Seite 184 - O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, what is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Seite 185 - Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution. No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave: And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave...
Seite 140 - Then sweet the hour that brings release From danger and from toil; We talk the battle over, And share the battle's spoil. The woodland rings with laugh and shout, As if a hunt were up, And woodland flowers are gathered To crown the soldier's cup. With merry songs we mock the wind That in the pine-top grieves, And slumber long and sweetly On beds of oaken leaves.
Seite 175 - The breaking waves dashed high On a stern and rock-bound coast, And the woods against a stormy sky Their giant branches tossed; And the heavy night hung dark The hills and waters o'er, When a band of exiles moored their bark On the wild New England shore.
Seite 350 - I steal by lawns and grassy plots, I slide by hazel covers ; I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance, Among my skimming swallows ; I make the netted sunbeam dance Against my sandy shallows. I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses ; I linger by my shingly bars ; I loiter round my cresses ; And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.
Seite 184 - Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming...

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