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The Special Messages of President Buchanan-The Ordinances of
Secession of the Six Withdrawing States-Preliminary Steps
taken therefor-Seizure of Forts and Arsenals-Meas-
ures Coercive and Conciliatory on the part of the
General Government-Messages of the Governors
of States North and South - Biographical
Sketches of Leading Men-Calhoun's Re-
markable Dream-President Jack-
son's Nullification Proclama-

tion, etc., etc., etc.

New York :

FOR SALE BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

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THE SPECIAL MESSAGES OF PRESIDENT BUCHANAN-THE ORDINANCES
OF SECESSION OF THE SIX WITHDRAWING STATES-PRELIMINARY
STEPS TAKEN THEREFOR-SEIZURE OF FORTS AND ARSENALS
MEASURES COERCIVE AND CONCILIATORY ON THE PART OF
THE GENERAL GOVERNMENT-MESSAGES OF THE GOVERN-
ORS OF STATES NORTH AND SOUTH-BIOGRAPHICAL
SKETCHES OF LEADING MEN-CALHOUN'S REMARKA.
BLE DREAM-PRESIDENT JACKSON'S NULLIFICA-

TION PROCLAMATION, ETC., ETC., ETC.

NEW YORK:
FOR SALE BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

us 53.12.26

FARVARD COLLEGE

MAY 23 1917
LIBRARY

By exchange

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by

T. C. FAULKNER,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District

of New York.

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HISTORY

OF THE

SECESSION REVOLUTION.

THE occurrences which have led to the withdrawal of six States from the Confederation, and the threatened dismemberment of the whole Union, through civil war, will be found accurately set forth in these pages. It is the purpose of the author only. to state facts-leaving the reader to form his own conclusions--the intention being merely to present, in a concise form, the history of the revolution which is now sweeping onward in the land.

The close of the sixtieth year of the nineteenth century is a period that will be made memorable in the annals, not only of this, but of all nations, for then it was that monarchies and empires turned their gaze Atlantic-ward, and watched with anxiety the effect of acts which must soon result seriously, for good or evil. We, as a nation, had just succeeded in a great commercial enterprise; had induced the rulers of a country, hitherto comparatively unknown to the civilized world, not only to treat with us, but to send ambassadors to ratify that treaty of commerce and amity. The people of the country, North and South, had done all in their power to produce a favorable impression upon these distinguished strangers, and had succeeded well. They had been sent from our shores bearing many tokens of our friendship and good will.

During that year we had also entertained the heir to one of the most powerful kingdoms in the world, and extended to him a true American hospitality, both at the seat of government and at our own commercial metropolis.

Our acts therefore during the year 1860, were such as, in many respects, to call the attention of foreign Powers to the rapid strides we were making towards wealth and prosperity.

In this year then, of the height of our nation's prosperity, the first blow was struck which severed this band of States, that for eighty-four ears had remained united. In 1832, when the people of the State of

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