Easy Lessons in Reading: For the Use of the Younger Classes in Common Schools

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J. & J.W. Prentiss, 1829 - 152 Seiten
 

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Seite 4 - BBOWN, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit : " Sertorius : or, the Roman Patriot.
Seite 121 - Father William replied, I remember'd that youth would fly fast, And abused not my health and my vigour at first, That I never might need them at last. You are old, Father William...
Seite 16 - When I am bid, I'll freely bring Whatever I have got ; And never touch a pretty thing If mother tells me not. When she permits me, I may tell About ray little toys ; But if she's busy or unwell, I must not make a noise.
Seite 121 - You are hale, Father William, — a hearty old man: Now tell me the reason, I pray.
Seite 143 - do you know who killed that beautiful little cherry tree yonder in the garden?" This was a tough question; and George staggered under it for a moment; but quickly recovered himself: and looking at his father, with the sweet face of youth brightened with the inexpressible charm of all-conquering truth, he bravely cried out, "I can't tell a lie, Pa; you know I can't tell a lie. I did cut it with my hatchet.
Seite 68 - There," said his father, when he had done, " now go without supper; you are to have no milk to-night, and you have been whipped. See how liars are served !" Then turning to Frank, " Come here, and shake hands with me, Frank; you will have no milk for supper, but that does not signify; you have told the truth, and have not been whipped, and everybody is pleased with you.
Seite 138 - Well (says he), my soup will be the thinner, but I will boil a slice of bread with it, and that will do it some good, at least. He went on again, and arrived at a little brook, over which was laid a narrow plank. A young woman coming up to pass at the same time, Robinet gallantly offered her his hand.
Seite 61 - MR. L. was one morning riding by himself, when, dismounting to gather a plant in the hedge, his horse got loose and galloped away before him. He followed, calling the horse by his name, which stopped, but on his approach set off again. At length a little boy in a neighbouring field, seeing the affair, ran across where the road made a turn, and, getting before the horse, took him by the bridle, and held him till his owner came up. Mr. L. looked at the boy, and admired his ruddy, cheerful countenance....
Seite 52 - Let me alone," cried Frank, in a cross, drowsy voice. — " Very well, then; a pleasant nap to you," said Harry, and down he ran as gay as a lark.
Seite 65 - Trusty, lying by the fireside. Trusty was a pretty, playful little dog, and the children were very fond of him. " Come," said Robert to Frank, " there is Trusty lying beside the fire, asleep ; let us go and waken him, and he will play with us.

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